Exhibits

Opening this coming Saturday, April 28th at Detour Gallery, a hugely impressive space in Red Bank, New Jersey, is CLASH: An Urban Collective, a group exhibition presenting a diverse array of urban artists. The image featured above was fashioned by Brooklyn-based Dain who remains active on the streets of NYC. What follows are several more images from the upcoming exhibit:

LA-based Cleon Peterson

LA-based Ashleigh Sumner

Norweigian artist Ståle Gerhardsen

Montreal-based Stikki Peaches in collaboration with Dain

New York-based Faile

The opening reception will be held Saturday evening from 6 to 9:30pm at Detour Gallery, 24 Clay Street in Red Bank, NJ. The exhibit continues through June 2.

Photos courtesy Detour Gallery

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Opening Saturday evening at WallWorks New York is “Tough Love,”  Irish artist Solus‘s first solo exhibition in NYC. Featuring 15 new paintings and prints, along with resin sculptures, “Tough Love” is a testament to the artist’s universal appeal as he continues his works’ theme of “overcoming life’s obstacles, being victorious against all odds, “hope” and not going down without a fight.”

The following images were captured at Solus’s studio back in Ireland, as he was readying for the exhibit:

Untitled

A glimpse of the artist’s studio

Tough Love

And his now iconic “Dream Big”

Opening this coming Saturday evening 5-8pm at 39 Bruckner Blvd in the Bronx, the exhibition continues through May 16.

And to coincide with the opening of “Tough Love,” Solus will be creating a mural courtesy of The L.I.S.A Project in downtown New York City. Sponsorship for this exhibition is in collaboration with The L.I.S.A Project and Culture Ireland.

All photographs courtesy of the artist

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Featuring a captivating range of paintings, drawings and pastels, Daze’s solo exhibition, Daily Commute, is a stirring ode to NYC – its diversity, its energy and its legendary graffiti culture. Handsomely curated, it continues through March 17 at P.P.O.W at 535 W 22nd Street in Chelsea. Pictured above is Midtown, rendered with oil, acrylic, spray paint and pumice on canvas. Several more images follow:

Rush Hour Reflection, oil, spray paint, acrylic and pumice on canvas

Eastern Parkway, oil, acrylic, spray paint and pumice on canvas

Masquerade W.H. in Times Square, oil, acrylic and spray paint on canvas

Stolen Moments, oil, acrylic and spray paint on canvas

Generations, oil, acrylic and spray paint on canvas

P.P.O.W is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10am to 6pm.

Photo credits: 1, 3, 5 & 6 Lois Stavsky; 2 & 4 Tara Murray

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We first came upon Alexis Duque‘s tantalizing aesthetic several years ago, when we discovered a meticulously detailed wheatpaste of his on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. We’ve been huge fans ever since. His rich and inventive sensibility is now on view in Paradise Lost— a solo exhibition opening tonight, March 7, and continuing through March 31 — at Paul Calendrillo New York.  Pictured above is Calaveras X, rendered with acrylic on canvas against a background inspired by post-colonial floor tiles of traditional Latin American homes — as seen by the artist on his many visits to his native country, Colombia. Several more masterfully crafted images, all suggestive of a world in which Paradise is lost, follow:

Truck, Acrylic on canvas, 2017, 16″ x 12″

Diana, Acrylic on canvas, 2017, 24″ x 16″

Slum, Acrylic on canvas, 2013, 31.5 x 23.5

And one of several sculptures on exhibit —

Dwelling, Cardboard, modeling paste, ink and acrylic, 2018, 20″ H x 10″ W x 10″ D

Paul Calendrillo New York is located at 547 West 27th St, Suite 600, in Chelsea and is open 11:00am to 6:00pm Tuesday – Saturday with extended hours on Thursdays that offer an opportunity to meet the artist. Tonight’s opening reception takes place from 6:00 to 8:00pm.

Photos of images: 1-4, Lois Stavsky & 5 Tara Murray

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Opening Saturday night at Spoke Art NYC is Meet Me At Delancey / Essex, featuring a diverse range of works by over 20 artists living and working in the greater NYC area. Curated by Jennifer RizzoMeet Me At Delancey / Essex is a celebration of community that brings together both emerging and established artists working in a variety of styles and genres, including many who have been active on our streets. The image above, Mars Bar RIP, was fashioned by the wonderfully talented Logan Hicks. Several more follow:

Ian Ferguson aka Hydeon, Busy Train Over the Bridge

Dennis McNett, Thunder Being

Aaron Li-Hill, The Last Flight

Swoon, Subway Windows

Among the other artists — whose works have also surfaced in public spaces — featured in this handsome exhibit are: Olek, Beau Stanton, Buff Monster and Ellis Gallagher. Meet Me At Delancey / Essex, where street, lowbrow, pop surrealism and new contemporary genres meet at Spoke Art NYC, opens with a reception this Saturday from 6-8 pm and continues through March 25th at 210 Rivington Street on the Lower East Side

Photos courtesy Spoke Art NYC

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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For the past month Brooklyn-based Sara Erenthal has set up base in Tel Aviv. What follows is a brief interview with the intensely committed multi-disciplinary artist:

What brought you to this region? 

It is where I was born, where I had left my religious upbringing and where, six years ago, I had my first art exhibition. And for the past several years, I’d wanted to return to share my art with the ex-Orthodox community and participate in the vibrant, expressive street art culture here.

Can you tell us a bit about the difference between “getting up” here and back home in Brooklyn?

There is more  freedom of expression on the streets here, and because I’m here for a limited amount of time, the experience has been far more intense.

What have been some of the highlights of this trip?

Visiting and painting in Bethlehem, my first time on the “other side,” and having the opportunity to exhibit my artwork here at the Red House Shapira in South Tel Aviv. And the amazing feature article in Haaretz by Tamar Rotem was, also, a highlight.

Can you tell us a bit your exhibit “Re-Cover” here at the Red House Shapira.  How did it happen? 

Shortly after I arrived in Tel Aviv, I visited the Red House Shapira, a unique space — housed in a historic building — known for its commitment to promoting diversity in the arts. There I met Oren Fischer who invited me to showcase an installation of new works created from found materials in the neighborhood.  My intent was to mirror the diversity of the neighborhood in a unified fashion, while giving new life to discarded matter.

What were some of the challenges you faced in making this happen?

The major challenge was the short period of time I had in pulling it all together. Both Tamar Rotem and Max Streetwalker offered me assistance in the logistics of collecting the varied materials and bringing them over to the studio. I am so grateful to them for their help. And, of course, I could not have accomplished this without the studio space that the Red House Shapira provided.

Congratulations! I look forward to seeing your work in similar installations in other cities, including, perhaps, NYC!

Note: “Re-Cover” can still be seen tomorrow, Sunday, from 11:00 to 17:00; Monday 12:00 to 19:00 and Tuesday 10:00 to 19:00 at the Red House Shapira, Israel MiSalant 39 in Shapira, Tel Aviv.

Interview conducted by Lois Stavsky

Photo credits: 1 & 2 Lois Stavsky; 3 Yonatan Ruttenberg and 4-6 Sara Erenthal

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Located just steps away from Israel’s controversial “Separation Wall,”  Banksy‘s Walled Off Hotel claims to offer the “worst view of any hotel in the world.”  That may well be, as the mammoth wall, even when covered with art, remains ugly and a sore reminder of the imbalance of power in the region.  But the hotel’s interior is a visual delight. Splendidly curated, it is also a fascinating foray into the roots of this 100-year, seemingly endless, conflict.

What follows  are several images captured from the hotel’s meticulously maintained lobby — or piano bar :

A variation of Banksy‘s iconic flower thrower

Banksy‘s take on the Biblical verse, “The lion shall lie down with the lamb”

A statue warding off tear gas

The following documentation of the struggle is among the exhibits on view off the lobby

And alongside the hotel, a friendly Wall-Mart, where graffiti supplies, stencils and a motley array of items can be purchased:

Curious as to what local residents think about it all, I spoke to 30-year old Naji, who grew up in a nearby refugee camp. He had the following to say: When Banksy first came here over ten years ago, I welcomed him  Some people here didn’t. They felt any attempt to “beautify” the wall trivializes its impact on our lives. Tourists come and go, but we have to look at it forever. But I, myself, feel grateful to Banksy, because he has brought attention to our cause. When people visit the wall to photograph it, they see how high it is, and they can get a sense of what our lives are like living under martial law. And my advice to the artists who come to paint here is: Get to know us first. You need to connect to us, as we feel disconnected from you. As far as The Walled Off Hotel, I’m of two minds. On one hand, it doesn’t represent my culture. But I like that it attracts visitors from all over the world and and that Banksy continues to employ many Palestinians.

The museum and art gallery are open to non-residents every day from 11am – 7:30pm.

Note: The second floor of The Walled Off Hotel is home to a gorgeous exhibit, curated by Dr.Housni Alkhateeb Shehada. of works in a range of media and styles fashioned by contemporary  Palestinian artists.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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With his boldly elegant visual language, Spanish artist J Demsky has been reinventing the alphabet for over 20 years. Here in NYC, he has recently brought his talents to our streets. And through February 10, his distinct aesthetic remains on view in OFF THE WALL, a duo exhibition with sculptor Brad Howe, at GR Gallery, 255 Bowery.

Pictured above is a mural painted by J Demsky in Manhattan. Following are two more murals that J Demsky has graced us with:

At the Welling Court Mural Project in Astoria

In Ridgewood

And two of several artworks newly crafted by J Demsky on view at GR Gallery:

Electricworm, Synthetic enamel on ACP, 45.2″ x 59″ 

Multistellar 1Synthetic enamel on ACP, 33.4″ x 48″

Located at 255 Bowery between East Houston and Stanton Streets, GR Gallery is open daily from 11 am to 6 pm.

All images courtesy GR Gallery

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Featuring a selection of large scale drawings and ninety six playing cards, Michael Alan‘s newest exhibition Mind Body Sound opens this evening, December 6, at KHORASHEH + GRUNERT,  524 West 19th Street in Chelsea.  What follows are several more of Michael’s seductively poetic images to be exhibited:

Kindred Spirit the Floating Princess, Watercolor, marker, pencil, acrylic, airbrush, gouache, paint marker on paper, 36″x48″

Sit and Sing, White ink on red paper, 30″x40″

Royal Petite, Mixed media on baseball card

Purple Nurple Grace, Mixed media on baseball card

In conjunction with the exhibit, the artist’s iconic Living Installation will take place in the center of the gallery as Michael Alan and Jadda Cat will create a four-hour HUG human sculpture using their bodies, props, fabrics, sounds and emotions. The Living Installation is by admission only this coming Saturday from 8pm-12pm.

People are welcome to come gather, watch, photograph, make art, become one! For tickets, visit here.

Images courtesy of the artist

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Launched in 2015 by SVA graduates Justin Aversano and Travis Rix, the non-profit SaveArtSpace has already transformed 66 advertising spaces into sites for public art in New York City, Miami, Los Angeles, Louisville and now Golden, Colorado.

Located at 650 West 46th Street in Hells Kitchen, the billboard featured above was designed by Brooklyn-based illustrator Feifei Ruan.  And, along with original artworks by local artist Sadie Starnes and NYC-based Israeli visual artist Meytar Moran, it can, also, be seen in Street Smart, an exhibition currently on view at the SVA Chelsea Gallery — with a special reception next Thursday, November 30th, 6-8pm.

Beginning December 4th SaveArtSpace will be bringing more public art to New York City, showcasing artists on advertising spaces throughout the area. Works by the selected artists will also be exhibited at The Living Gallery Outpost, with an opening reception on December 13, 2017. What follows is a sampling of what you can expect to see there:

 Brandon Sines — known to us street art aficionados as Frank Ape, Social Media Isn’t Always Social

Brooklyn native Angela Alba, Pink Pool

Brooklyn-based Felipe Posada, ‘Can’t Wear My Mask…

And if you are interested in submitting your art for future Save Art Space projects, check this link out.

All images courtesy SaveArtSpace

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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