Elle

Gracing the 21-floor staircase of the new citizenM New York Bowery is MoSA (the Museum of Street Art), a rich range of images and words fashioned by 21 5 Pointz Creates artists under the curatorial direction of Marie Cecile Flageul. After visiting the soon-to-open hotel, I had the opportunity to speak to Marie who, along with 5 Pointz founder Meres One, has been directing the project since its inception:

This project is quite remarkable! Can you tell us a bit about its background? 

In Fall 2016, we held our first meeting with citizenM‘s chief marketing officer, Robin Chadha, a huge art lover who is intent on integrating art into his projects. He had been following the entire 5 Pointz story from Amsterdam, where he is based. He approached us because he was interested in bringing back a bit of 5 Pointz to NYC. The result is MoSA,

What about the staircase installation, A Vertical Love Letter to the Bowery? What is the concept behind it?

citizenM tries to understand and embrace the communities they move into. And this particular Lower Manhattan neighborhood has an incredibly rich history, which we attempted to capture with images of significant faces, places, moments and words.

How did you decide which artists to include?

Every artist included had contributed to 5 Pointz. Once I came up with the story line and quotations, it was easy for me to select artists. I had learned from Meres how to look at aerosol art and understand its visual voice.

What were some of the challenges that came your way in the course of managing and curating this project?

A major challenge was giving up control and trusting the artists once they understood the concept and direction of the project. There were also several logistic issues. There was no air conditioning early on, and the lack of elevators became a joke. But it all evolved into a kind of musical chaos, as all of the workers and staff here have been incredibly enthusiastic and supportive.

As it is nearing completion, what are your thoughts regarding the final outcome of this project?

I am humbled by the amount of love, hard work and dedication every artist has put into this project. Their attention to detail has inspired me. I am hopeful that thousands will see it — 5000 square feet that anyone can enjoy and a priceless gift to Downtown Manhattan.

How can folks who are not hotel guests gain access to the exhibit?

As early as October 1, anyone can come into the lobby — between 10am and 5pm — with ID and walk through the exhibition. I will be giving a personal tour to the first 500 folks who register. Groups of 10 or more people can email me at marie@5ptz.com 

Congratulations! And what a great way for visitors and students to learn about the history of this historic neighborhood! I look forward to revisiting it soon.

Note: All of the artists who participated in this project are identified here, and brief interviews with them with videography by Rae Maxwell, along with original soundtrack by Say Word Entertainment artists Rabbi Darkside and The Grand Affair, can be viewed here. In addition to A Vertical Love Letter to the Bowery, a court installation is underway by Rubin 415, Esteban del ValleDon Rimx, Lady Pink and Meres One. And gracing the plaza outside the hotel’s entrance is a captivating mural by Meres One, blurring the line between graffiti and fine art.

citizenM New York Bowery is located at 189 Bowery off Delancey Street.

Images:

1. Meres One

2. Marie and Meres on roof top of citizenM New York Bowery

3. Nicholai Khan

4. See TF

5. Zimad

6. Vince Ballentine

7. Kenji Takabayashi  aka Python

8. Elle

9. Noir

Interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky; photos by Lois Stavsky

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astro-mural-street-art-harlem-nyc

Not A Crime‘s summer-long street art campaign for education equality continues to enhance the streets of Harlem. Featured above is Paris-based Astro’s first mural in NYC.  Here are several more that have surfaced since the spring:

Chilean artist Cekis, close-up

cekis-street-art-mural-harlem-NYC

South African artist Ricky Lee Gordon

Ricky-Lee-Gordon-mural-art-street-art-Harlem-NYC

 Australian artist Rone, close-up of Nasim Biglari

Rone-mural-art-harlem-not-a-crime-nyc

Brazilian artist Alexandre Keto, close-up

Alexandre-Keto=mural-art-harlem-nyc

 Harlem’s legendary Franco the Great

franco-the-great-mural-harlem-nyc

 South Carolina – based Patch Whisky at work

patch-whisky-paintss-street-art-Harlem-nyc

Close-up from Patch Whisky‘s completed mural

patch-whisky-mural-art-nyc

Brooklyn-based Elle at work

elle-paints-in-Harlem

Close-up from Elles completed mural

elle-street-art-harlem

An expansion of last year’s NYC-based mural campaign covering four boroughs and New Jersey, the #NotACrime Street Art Campaign for Education Equality is curated by Street Art Anarchy.  Now in its second year, the #NotACrime campaign was founded by Maziar Bahari to expose Iran’s human rights violations.

Note: Keep posted to our Facebook page for additional murals from Not A Crime‘s street art campaign for education equality by Erik Burke, Tats CruCol Wallnuts and more. You can also check out videos of artists at work and more on the Education Is Not a Crime Facebook page.

Education-Is-Not-a-Crime

Photo credits: 1, 4 – 6 & 8 Tara Murray; 2, 3 & 10 Lois Stavsky; 9 & 7 bytegirl

Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

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Jily-Ballistic-and-JPO-art-17-Frost

SOLD Magazine launched this past Thursday evening with an exhibit — co-curated with Ellis Gallagher — and party at 17 Frost. When I stopped by early in the evening, I had the opportunity to speak to John Paul O’Grodnick, who — along with Greg Frederick and BD White — made it all happen.

 Just what is SOLD Magazine?

SOLD Magazine is a free magazine by artists for artists and art lovers. Among its features are: artists interviewing each other, studio visits, artist and photographer profiles, a travel section and much more.

What motivated you thee to launch it?

A sense that artists need a new platform for exposure. Our mission is to provide that platform.

chris-rwk-art-17-frost

 When did you guys first begin working on SOLD Magazine? And how did you fund it?

We began working on it at the beginning of October, and we funded it via a Kickstarter campaign.

It’s great that your campaign was so successful! What has been your greatest challenge in seeing this through?

Rounding up the artists whom we wanted to participate in our venture.

raquel-echanique-17-Frost-exhibit

 Was it an open call? How did you decide which artists to include?

No! It was artists we’ve known and worked with in the past. Some of them suggested others.

How often do you expect to publish SOLD Magazine?

Once every three months. It is intended as a quarterly.

elle-art-17-Frost-nyc

How will folks be able to get hold of it?

We plan to make it available in galleries and museums throughout the city, as well as in local businesses here in Williamsburg.

I notice that this premier issue focuses on female artists, with your first cover featuring Gilf and Elle. What can we expect in future issues?

Every issue will have a theme. Our next one will focus on collaborations.

Ramiro-Davato-art -at-17-Frost

 That sounds great! Congratulations!

Note: The above images of are of works that were on exhibit and for sale at Thursday evening’s SOLD Magazine‘s launch:

1. Jily Ballistic and John Paul O’Grodnick aka JPO

2. Chris RWK

3. Raquel Echanique

4. Elle

5. Ramiro Davaro

Interview by Lois Stavsky and photos by Tara Murray

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This is the eighth in a series of occasional posts featuring some of the curious characters that surface on NYC streets:

Mike Lee in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

mike-lee-street-art-nyc

Werc, close-up in Long Island City

werc-close-up-street-art-nyc

Elle and the London Police on Manhattan’s Lower East Side

elle-and-london-police-street-art-nyc 2

Buff Monster at the Bushwick Collective

buff-monster-street-art-nyc

Binho in Long Island City

binho-street-art-nyc

Esteban del Valle at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

Esteban-del-valle-welling-court-street-art-nyc

Photo credits: 1, 3 & 5 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2, 4 & 6 Lois Stavsky

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This past Sunday, the 5Pointz family continued its transformation of August Martin HS with some of the finest international, national and local artists adding their talents and visions to the extraordinary indoor gallery the school has become. Here’s a small sampling of more of the works that now grace the hallways and doors of the Jamaica, Queens high school:

El Niño de las Pinturas in from Spain

El-Nino-de-las-Pinturas-art-August-Martin-High-School

NYC-based Ben Angotti

"Ben Angotti"

Queens-based Nicholai Khan with August Martin student Justin Price (interviewed by Street Art NYC) and project co-curator Marie Cecile Flaegul

"Nicholai Kahn"

Trace, New Wave Crew at work

Trace-graffiti-august-martin-high-school

Skio in from Paris and Brooklyn-based Elle

skio-and-elle-art

Bronx-native Andre Trenier at work

andre-trenier-paints

NYC’s ZaOne

zaone-graffiti-stay-in-school

5Pointz curator Meres One

Meres-light-bulbs-august-martin-high-school

Note: The school will be open to the public on Thursday, June 11, from 4-8pm.

Keep posted to the StreetArtNYC Facebook page for many more images of the amazing artworks.

Photo credits: 1, 3, 6 & 8 Lois Stavsky; 2, 4, 5 & 7 Tara Murray

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A specialized new online gallery certain to appeal to us street art aficionados, Cluster Wall launches tomorrow evening with an exhibit and party at 17 Frost in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. We recently had the opportunity to speak to Cluster Wall’s founder, Evan Tobias. 

Chris-RWK-Cluster-Wall

What is Cluster Wall? Why that name?

It is a term I respond to! As an art-lover and collector, I tend to cluster art of all colors and styles in our Brooklyn apartment. The results are vibrant, bold and kinetic, like New York City, itself!

What is your mission in launching Cluster Wall?

My mission is to provide art lovers with the opportunity to purchase first-rate, hand-embellished affordable art. There will not be any ink jet prints. All of the artworks will be signed and numbered, and editions will be limited. Prints will be released in a series of 100 or fewer. And, in addition, a small number of original works will also be made available.

"Evan Tobias"

What work experiences do you bring with you to your current position?

I was the founder and editor of Block Magazine, and founder of the Full Circle Bar in Williamsburg.

Most of the artists — whose works you will be exhibiting and selling — are active on the streets. Why the focus on street art?

I’m a big fan of street art. I’ve been living in Williamsburg since 2001, and I’ve seen how street art has enhanced my neighborhood. It has made it a better place to live. But Cluster Wall is not limited to street artists. I will be releasing artworks by other contemporary urban artists, as well.

the-drif

How did you decide which artists to work with?

I started off by contacting artists I know, and then I was connected to some others. I was specifically looking for artwork that I love that would also work well as prints.

Can you tell us something about this weekend’s exhibit? What can we expect to see?

We will be featuring prints and original artworks by Chris RWK, Joe Iurato, Rubin, ASVP, Elle, The Drif, London Kaye, Solus, Opie and ORYX, along with collaborative works by John Paul O’Grodnick and Jilly Ballistic, who will also be painting live.

Jilly-ballistic-and-j-p-o

What is Cluster Wall bringing to the art scene?

It provides art lovers with the opportunity to collect outstanding, innovative artwork at modest prices.

That all sounds great! Good luck!

Joe-Iurato-cluster-wall

Note: The launch begins at 7pm tomorrow — Saturday — at 17 Frost Street and will feature, along with dozens of artworks, music by DJ Nigel Rubirosa and refreshments provided by Lion Beer and Sea Grape Wines.

Interview conducted by City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud.

Photos

1. Chris RWK  

2. Cluster Wall founder Evan Tobias, seated in front of artwork by London Kaye 

3. The Drif

4. John Paul O’Grodnick and Jilly Ballistic

5.  Joe Iurato

All photos courtesy Cluster Wall, except for pic of Evan by Lois Stavsky

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This is the seventh post in an occasional series featuring artwork on NYC shutters:

Elle at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

Elle

Foxxface in Bushwick

Foxxface

Peruvian artist Biark in the Rockaways

Biark

Caratoes in the Bronx for the Tag Public Arts Project

caratoes

Claw Money and Lexi Bella at the Bushwick Collective

Claw-money-Lexi-Bella-street-art-Bushwick=Collective-nyc

Mark Paul Deren aka MADSTEEZ on the Lower East Side

mad-steez-street-art-shutter-NYC

UR New York in Bushwick

"UR New York"

Queen Andrea in the East Village for the LISA Project

Queen-Andrea-street-art-LES-JPG

Photos: 1, 4 & 5 Lois Stavsky; 2, 6-8 Dani Reyes Mozeson and 3 by Tara Murray

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Fumero

The rooftop of the 407 Bushwick, located at 407 Johnson Avenue, elevates the wonder and energy of street art. I recently had the chance to visit it and speak to its curator, Fumero.

You’ve transformed this rooftop into a vibrant canvas drenched with dazzling colors in an array of styles. How did this come about?

A friend of mine, dj and producer Onda Skillet, lives at the 407 Bushwick.  He was looking to bring some color to the rooftop that was covered mostly with old throw-ups. And I saw this as a great opportunity to bring the energy of the streets up to the roof.

Nicole-Salgar-and-Chuck-Berrett-and-Raquel-Echanique-at-the-407-Bushwick-street-art

You invited such a wonderfully diverse group of artists to paint here. Can you tell us something about how that came about?

In curating this rooftop, I chose artists whom I’ve met — and often worked with — throughout the years in different settings. I asked them to bring their distinct iconography with them. Some had never painted on walls before.

"Gumdrop and Whisbe"

You are consistently active on the streets. What is the appeal of the roof to you?  I remember catching glimpses of your pieces up here from street level and feeling frustrated that I couldn’t see more of them!

That’s part of the appeal. It incites interest. The roof is kind of a secret society. We are free to invite whom we want and no haters are allowed!

Cruz

Where would you rather paint – on the streets or on a rooftop?

I like them both.  They are different experiences. When I paint on the streets, I can engage people. But the roof has a distinct energy that I love.

"Craig Anthony Miller and Federico Cruz"

Your recent event Art in the Air, Music Underground, hosted by Aphotic, featured music, as well as art. Can you tell us something about that? How integral is music to what you are doing at the 407 Bushwick?

Its role is essential. The audio creations, performed by Onda Skillet with his Aerotropic label, were the perfect complement to the art. Opening rooftops to music and art is the next big thing! What’s happening here is a landmark. It is the future.

"JP O’Grodnick"

What about the location of the 407 Bushwick? Any thoughts about that?

The location couldn’t be more perfect. Bushwick is what the Lower East Side was 30 years ago. It’s the hub of cutting-edge art and music. The 407 Bushwick is the new CBGB.

Elle

What’s ahead?

More great energy, art and music! The second Art in the Air, Music Underground will take place this summer. The artists are already lined up, and we are now seeking sponsorship.

Fumero

It all sounds wonderful! What a great outdoor gallery NYC is!

Photos: 1. Fumero; 2. Nicole Salgar & Chuck Berrett with Raquel Echanique on right; 3. Gumshoe and Whisbe; 4. Cruz; 5. CAM and segment of Cruz; 6. John Paul O’Grodnick; 7. Elle, and 8. Fumero

Interview with Fumero and photos by Lois Stavsky; also featured on the roof of the 407 Bushwick are new works by Joseph Meloy, AOM, NS/CB, The Cupcake Guy, Rafal Pisarczyk and Robyn Henderson.

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Currently on exhibit at Chelsea’s ArtNowNY is “Push It,” an exuberant show featuring works by over 20 female artists working in a remarkable range of expressive modes.  Fresh new talents are showcased alongside legendary artists — many with roots in graffiti and street art. Here’s a sampling of works by six artists who consistently share their visions with us in public spaces:

Swoon

"Swoon"

Elle

Elle

Lady Pink

"Lady Pink"

Lady Aiko

Aiko

Alice Mizrachi

"Alice Mizrachi"

Vexta, close-up

Vexta

Maya Hayuk

"Maya Hayuk"

Curated by Melissa McCaig-Welles, the exhibit continues through April 26 at ArtNowNY, 548 West 28th Street in Chelsea’s gallery district.

Images of artwork by Dani Reyes Mozeson, Lois Stavsky and City-as-School intern Dea Sumrall

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This is the sixth in an occasional series of artwork on NYC shutters:

Ewok in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Ewok

Alice Mizrachi aka AM in East Harlem

"Alice Mizrachi"

Michael De Feo on Manhattan’s Lower East Side

Michael De Feo

Part One in East Harlem

"Part I"

Vato in Williamsburg

Vato

BeauElle and Hue on Manhattan’s Lower East Side

"Beau and Elle"

Crisp in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Crisp

Fumero in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Fumero

Icy and Sot in Bushwick, Brooklyn

"Icy and Sot"

Photo of Michael De Feo by Tara Murray; all others by Lois Stavsky 

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