public art

Recently installed on the embankment of Sajsary Lake in Yakutsk, Russia — the second coldest city in the world —  is a massive sculpture fashioned by Spanish artist Okuda San Miguel.  Forged with steel in his infectious signature style, the 4-meter public art object represents the artist’s vision of the primitive man —  a punk-like figure sporting spiked hair, released from civilization’s shackles.

Curated by the National Art Museum of the Republic of Sakha in collaboration with Artmossphere, Okuda’s 4-meter public art object, Ancestral Retromirage, is the final project of the fifth International Yakut Biennale of Contemporary Art that began in April 2018.

Photos courtesy of Artmossphere

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On several day trips to Charlotte, North Carolina, StreetArtNYC contributor Tara Murray discovered a treasure trove of murals. Pictured above is an image of Neptune, the Roman god of the sea, fashioned by Matt Moore & Matt Hooker with Tucker Sward. Several more images of Charlotte street art — captured by Tara — follow:

Charlotte-based artist Nick Napoletano 

Osiris Rain with Nick Napoletano 

Miami-based Hoxxoh, close-up for the Talking Walls Festival

Charlotte-based Nico Amortegui

Argentine-American artist Ramiro Davaro-Comas for the Talking Walls Festival

Photos by Tara Murray

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Conceived in 2014, the RAW Project has been bringing color, intrigue and inspiration to schools in Miami and beyond at a time when American schools continue to see their art programs defunded. During the week of Art Basel, a group of outstanding local, national and global artists transformed magnet school South Miami K-8 Center into an open-air museum. The image pictured above was painted by Berlin-based Peruvian artist Danny Figueroa aka WESR.  Several more images — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — follow:

U.K.-based My Dog Sighs

London-based Otto Schade

Miami-based Jay Bellicchi aka Remoteroc

Miami-based Nicaraguan artist Luis Valle aka El Chan Guri

Denver-based Patrick Kane McGregor with Netherlands native David Louf aka Mr. June 

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad 

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This is the 14th in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of faces that have surfaced in NYC open spaces:

New Zealand-based Owen Dippie in collaboration with Al Diaz aka SAMO in Bushwick

Tel Aviv-based Solomon Souza

Huge segment of complete mural on the facade of the Brooklyn Commons on Marcus Garvey Boulevard

Brooklyn-based Ben Angotti in First Street Green Park for the Inspire Change Festival

Brooklyn-based Danielle Mastrion with Dorothy Gale, close-up from huge mural in First Street Green Park for the Inspire Change Festival

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak

While in Vienna, I had the chance to meet and talk with Jakob Kattner, founder of Calle Libre, the impressive mural festival that has been enlivening Vienna’s 6th and 7th district walls since 2014.

How would you describe Calle Libre? And why the Spanish name?

I would describe Calle Libre as a festival of urban aesthetics. My doctoral thesis focused on urban art in South America. I researched it there for 14 months, and this festival is my way to give back to the artists who helped me — who let me live with them and document their lives.

Where in South America did you do your street art research?

Colombia was the first country I visited. Stinkfish became a friend. He introduced me to the local scene, which really paved the way for me to explore further. I then went to Brazil, where I found a unique urban art style whose history is unfamiliar to most people. And, finally, Argentina. There I could feel how the weight of dictatorial history had impacted the street art scene but, also, how artists finally found their freedom.

How has Calle Libre evolved since 2014?

 We have broadened the programing every year. It started with live painting at the Danube Canal, along with an exhibition. We then added workshops at mumok. And the following year, we hosted film screenings, organized performances and presented artist talks. We also started doing annual signed screen print editions in collaboration with Limited Edition Art Prints aka LEAP. Among the artists we work with are Millo, Alfalfa, Inkman, Rodrigo Branco and Stinkfish. And in 2017, we launched guided tours.

What would you say is your main mission?

Intercultural exchange through art. We always include South American and local artists.

Is this your full time job?

I run a creative advertising agency called Warda Network. We produce creative, video and digital content. Actually, the agency does the documentation for Calle Libre, but the festival is its own separate nonprofit entity.

That’s why your online documentation is so great! Can you tell us something about your background?

I studied fine art and cultural theory. I am also a rapper. I’ve always wanted to work with moving images. I directed my own music video and that’s how I met my current partner at Warda Network.

Who is your team? Who helps you produce Calle Libre?

We are a team of seven. My fiancé, Laura, and I are the curators. When we started, it was just the two of us — and we still can’t believe how we managed to create an entire festival! Today, we rely on our team.

How many murals have you produced so far? 

 More than 35 but I am not sure how many are still up.

How have people reacted to Calle Libre?

It has been all positive feedback, especially from people who live near the walls that are painted during the festival. There is always a person from the team at each wall, and we have heard great things. We’ve also had funny incidents.

Such as?

When Mantra painted his 3D butterflies, someone asked us how he was able to put glass over such a big wall. And when Nychos painted a naked woman with a parrot on her shoulder in his signature Jugendstil-inspired style, a woman — whose house window faced the mural — asked why he was drawing her.

Do you focus on specific neighborhoods?

Each year we try to include new districts, but the 6th and 7th are where we have the most walls. It’s also where most of us live. These districts like the impact we’ve had, so we have good relationships with them. We try to pair artists with walls in relevant contexts. For example, the mural by Stinkfish — featuring a father carrying his child — is located on a kindergarten school property.

Have you collaborated with any museums in Vienna aside from mumok.?

The Albertina Museum contacted us about a possible collaboration on a Keith Haring exhibition. When we received the news, it was like we were knighted!

How do you get the funding to produce such a significant festival?

We get public funding from the city. We also received money from the European Union our first year. We apply for project grants, and we collaborate with local partners, based on where the walls are. It’s like playing the lottery! We never know how the next festival will be funded. We work for free and we love what we do, but it’s nice when the city and citizens give back. Every time we walk past the walls, we feel a sense of gratification.

Who are some of your favorite local artists?

Perk Up, Skirl, Frau Isa

What has been your biggest challenge since you first launched Calle Libre?

Convincing building owners to let us paint the walls! That’s definitely the hardest part.

Are there any artists on your wish list?

Inti, Pixel Pancho, Herakut, Os Gemeos. I also want to bring talented artists from South America who are not yet well-known in Europe.

I’m looking forward to seeing what’s next!

Images

1 Stinkfish

2 Kashink

3 Mr Woodland

4 HNRX

Mantra

6 Millo

7 Koz Dos

Interview and images by Houda Lazrak

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak

Since the International Public Art Festival (IPAF) produced the first mural and street art festival on Isla Holbox in 2014, the island — an off-the-beaten-path tropical destination located on the north coast of the Yucatán Peninsula — has been home to several dozen public artworks. The image featured above is the work of  the celebrated Mexican artist Edgar Saner. Several more murals that greeted me during a recent trip to Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula follow:

Mexican artist and musician Ekza One

Peruvian artist Jade Rivera

The Mexican graffiti and street art collective Pinta o Muere

As part of the protected nature reserve Yum Balam, the island’s local culture is deeply connected to its nonhuman inhabitants and Isla Holbox makes special efforts to follow environmentally conscious practices. The island’s diverse wildlife life and some of its marine folklore are reflected on the walls of its sandy car-free streets. Below is a small selection of these murals scattered throughout Holbox:

Canadian artist Labrona

Mexican artist Luna Vega

Montreal-based artist and IPAF Festival co-founder Ruben Carrasco 

Photos by Houda Lazrak

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Founded and curated by Miami-based Registered Artist, the Second Annual aWall Mural Projects took place in Miami from Dec 1-9 bringing a diversely rich range of artworks to The Santa Clara Elementary School in Allapattah. Featured above is the hugely talented Asian artist Sheep Chen at work on a delightfully playful, brightly hued mural. Several more images — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — at Allapattah’s Santa Clara Elementary School follow:

Project curator Registered Artist

South Africa-based Sonny Sundancer

UK-based My Dog Sighs 

New York-based Tom Bob and Texas-born Asian artist Emily Ding

Emily Ding, closer-up

And New York-based Key Detail at work

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad

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While in San Jose for this year’s POW! WOW! festival, travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad had the opportunity to explore the city’s intriguingly diverse street art. Featured above is the work of LA-based artist El Mac, Sophie Holding the World Together, commissioned in 2017 by San Jose Museum of Art in collaboration with The Propeller Group and Empire Seven Studios. Several more images follow:

 West Coast-based mixed-media artist  Andrew Schoultz, curated by Empire Seven Studios

Philadelphia-based Nosego, curated by Empire Seven Studios

Bay area- based Kristin Farr for POW! WOW! 2017

Bay area-based artists Lacey Bryant and Ben Henderson, segment of larger mural for POW! WOW! 2017

Sainer of Poland’s Etam Cru, curated by Empire Seven Studios

Native-American artist Jaque Fragua, curated by Empire Seven Studios

Oakland-based Jet Martinez & Amsterdam-based Adele Renault for POW! WOW! 2017

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad

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Introducing the general public to an eclectic range of outstanding street artists from across the globe while boosting the development of the local street art scene, the third Russian biennale Artmossphere is now near completion. A particular highlight of this year’s Artmossphere was Shepard Fairey’s huge outdoor mural, Tunnel Vision, inspired by the bold aesthetics of Russian Constructivism. Several more images — representative of the wonderfully diverse artwork that made its way into Artmossphere 2018 — follow:

Shepard Fairey at work earlier on with a little help from his friends

Amsterdam-based Adele Renault at work on one of her signature birds with the legendary Martha Cooper capturing it all

Brooklyn-based assemblage artist Hyland Mather at work as he repurposes discarded materials into an intriguing installation

Swedish graphic designer Finsta’s completed installation

NYC’s masterful FAUST

Berlin’s 1Up Crew’s installation”Burner Phones”

Photo credits: Vasiliy Kudryavtsev

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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POW! WOW!, the international art movement that celebrates culture, music and art in cities throughout the globe, continues this week to enhance the city of San Jose. The image featured above was painted by Ivan Gonzalez. Several more works — many in progress and all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — follow:

Local artist Drew Flores at work — on ladder — with a little help from his friend

Dragon 76 and Woes — along with local students — posing in front of their mural

Iranian brothers, Icy and Sot at work on “Ladders to Nowhere,” a metaphor for the inhumane  US prison system, which makes it almost impossible for a released prisoner to move up in society

Korean artist Sixcoin at work on “Gulliver”

West Coast-based Apexer at work

Hawaii-based Kamehanaokalā aka Cory Taum at work

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad

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