urban art

A non-profit arts organization that creates opportunities for local and international artists to showcase their talents and share them with others, HKwalls recently held its sixth annual street art festival — in collaboration with Design District HK — in Wan Chai, HK. With sponsorship from Vans — along with other brands including the environmentally-friendly eicó paint — live painting, arts workshops, exhibitions and guided street art tours took place from March 23-31.

The delightfully playful image pictured above was painted by Richmond-based artist Wingchow. Following are several more images of artworks that surfaced during HKwalls 2019 — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad.

French artist Tim Marsh, segment of larger mural

UK-based Insa

Chinese crew KwanClansegment of larger mural

Berlin/Hamburg based duo Low Bros

Montreal-based artist Fluke to the left of his stunning mural

Canadian artist Priscilla Yu

Spanish artist Muro at work

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Dedicated to expanding skateboard culture and education throughout the globe, Learn and Skate — the non-profit founded in France in 2012 — is now on a mission to build a cultural center in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia that will host a library, along with English, music and art classes. Earlier this month, Learn and Skate joined forces with the Museum of Les Abattoirs in Toulouse to launch a skateboard exhibition, featuring works — now online for bidding on Paddle 8 — designed by a diverse range of first-rate urban artists. Featured above are decks designed by Abstrk, Skount, Zalez and Ricardo Cavolo. The following images were captured at the festivities that accompanied the exhibition’s launch:

Exhibition opening

Musicians at play with decks by Mr Cenz, Liard Arnaud, Poni and Hush

Young artists at work

Proud young artist

Works created for Paddle 8 auction by (left to right) French artists Siker, Der, Korail, Superstop and Zalez

Limited edition signed and numbered  photograph by legendary skater and artist Steve Olson

You can view all of the artworks and bid on them here to help support the production of  a cultural center in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Bidding ends on April 24 at 12pm.

All photos courtesy of “Learn and Skate”

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The streets of New Orleans — particularly those in the Marigny and the Bywater neighborhoods — teem with a wide range of public art.  Pictured above is a mural painted by New Orleans-based visual artist and activist, Brandan Bmike Odums. Several other images captured on my recent visit to NOLA follow:

The remarkable Reader aka Booker, OYE & more — one of his dozens of pieces in NOLA

The legendary New Orleans-based You Go Girl aka Hugo Gyrl in a delicate vein

New Orleans-based Mr Balloon Hands 

Seattle-based Craig Cundiff with the NOLA Mural Project

New Orleans-based Havana-born artist Ramiro Diaz

You Go Girl and Reader collaboration

Photos: 1-6 Lois Stavsky; 7 Sara Erenthal

Coming next: the graffiti outside and inside and on the rooftops of the abandoned Bywater naval base

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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The mural pictured above was painted by the hugely talented Los Angeles-based painter and designer Tristan Eaton at Wynwood Walls in 2017.  Several more images captured by Houda Lazrak while in Wynwood for the weekend follow:

Spanish artist Deih at Wynwood Walls

Deih, close-up

Crash, Abstrk and Stephen Palladino 

Stephen Palladino, close-up

West Coast-based Hueman at Wynwood Walls

Pez, Kram and Bust collaboration

French artist Pro 176 at Wynwood Walls

Photos by Houda Lazrak

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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LIMINAL SPACE, Dave Persue‘s first solo exhibition at GR Gallery, showcases the varied and ever-evolving aesthetic of the acclaimed, pioneering West Coast urban artist. Along with works on paper and large canvases are images painted directly onto the gallery walls. On display, too, is a sampling of  classic merchandise — including a children’s book — featuring the legendary Bunny Kitty. Pictured above is the exhibit’s exuberant title piece, Liminal Space, fashioned with acrylic on canvas and glued onto a board in the artist’s frame. What follows are several more images I captured while visiting the gallery:

Dreamstate (Reprise), Acrylic on canvas

A series of artworks inspired by the West Coast artist’s current city, NYC, and its sprawling subways

Luck Dragon painted onto gallery wall

New York Wet Paint, acrylic on canvascollaboration with WANE

And from graffiti art to the aesthetics of fine art with Lafayette, Acrylic on canvas

LIMINAL SPACE continues at GR Gallery, 255 Bowery, through next Sunday. The gallery is open Tuesday – Sunday from 12-7pm.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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The 7th edition of the Basel House Mural Festival took place from December 7 through December 9 at the RC Cola Plant, 550 Northwest 24th Street, bringing three days of live music and art to the heart of Wynwood, Miami. As in previous years, artists from across the globe, along with local and national ones, restyled the industrial space with dazzling, brilliantly-hued images. Featured above is the work of Brazilian muralist Sipros. Several more artworks — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — follow:

Miami-based, Colombia-born Danny Osorno aka Anonymous

Amsterdam-based Hugo Mulder

Miami-based painter Claudio Picasso

Guatemalan artist Javier España

NY-based See One and Optimo NYC

Bay Area muralists Illuminaries, Kemest 510

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad

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On several day trips to Charlotte, North Carolina, StreetArtNYC contributor Tara Murray discovered a treasure trove of murals. Pictured above is an image of Neptune, the Roman god of the sea, fashioned by Matt Moore & Matt Hooker with Tucker Sward. Several more images of Charlotte street art — captured by Tara — follow:

Charlotte-based artist Nick Napoletano 

Osiris Rain with Nick Napoletano 

Miami-based Hoxxoh, close-up for the Talking Walls Festival

Charlotte-based Nico Amortegui

Argentine-American artist Ramiro Davaro-Comas for the Talking Walls Festival

Photos by Tara Murray

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Conceived in 2014, the RAW Project has been bringing color, intrigue and inspiration to schools in Miami and beyond at a time when American schools continue to see their art programs defunded. During the week of Art Basel, a group of outstanding local, national and global artists transformed magnet school South Miami K-8 Center into an open-air museum. The image pictured above was painted by Berlin-based Peruvian artist Danny Figueroa aka WESR.  Several more images — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — follow:

U.K.-based My Dog Sighs

London-based Otto Schade

Miami-based Jay Bellicchi aka Remoteroc

Miami-based Nicaraguan artist Luis Valle aka El Chan Guri

Denver-based Patrick Kane McGregor with Netherlands native David Louf aka Mr. June 

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad 

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This is the 14th in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of faces that have surfaced in NYC open spaces:

New Zealand-based Owen Dippie in collaboration with Al Diaz aka SAMO in Bushwick

Tel Aviv-based Solomon Souza

Huge segment of complete mural on the facade of the Brooklyn Commons on Marcus Garvey Boulevard

Brooklyn-based Ben Angotti in First Street Green Park for the Inspire Change Festival

Brooklyn-based Danielle Mastrion with Dorothy Gale, close-up from huge mural in First Street Green Park for the Inspire Change Festival

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak

While in Vienna, I had the chance to meet and talk with Jakob Kattner, founder of Calle Libre, the impressive mural festival that has been enlivening Vienna’s 6th and 7th district walls since 2014.

How would you describe Calle Libre? And why the Spanish name?

I would describe Calle Libre as a festival of urban aesthetics. My doctoral thesis focused on urban art in South America. I researched it there for 14 months, and this festival is my way to give back to the artists who helped me — who let me live with them and document their lives.

Where in South America did you do your street art research?

Colombia was the first country I visited. Stinkfish became a friend. He introduced me to the local scene, which really paved the way for me to explore further. I then went to Brazil, where I found a unique urban art style whose history is unfamiliar to most people. And, finally, Argentina. There I could feel how the weight of dictatorial history had impacted the street art scene but, also, how artists finally found their freedom.

How has Calle Libre evolved since 2014?

 We have broadened the programing every year. It started with live painting at the Danube Canal, along with an exhibition. We then added workshops at mumok. And the following year, we hosted film screenings, organized performances and presented artist talks. We also started doing annual signed screen print editions in collaboration with Limited Edition Art Prints aka LEAP. Among the artists we work with are Millo, Alfalfa, Inkman, Rodrigo Branco and Stinkfish. And in 2017, we launched guided tours.

What would you say is your main mission?

Intercultural exchange through art. We always include South American and local artists.

Is this your full time job?

I run a creative advertising agency called Warda Network. We produce creative, video and digital content. Actually, the agency does the documentation for Calle Libre, but the festival is its own separate nonprofit entity.

That’s why your online documentation is so great! Can you tell us something about your background?

I studied fine art and cultural theory. I am also a rapper. I’ve always wanted to work with moving images. I directed my own music video and that’s how I met my current partner at Warda Network.

Who is your team? Who helps you produce Calle Libre?

We are a team of seven. My fiancé, Laura, and I are the curators. When we started, it was just the two of us — and we still can’t believe how we managed to create an entire festival! Today, we rely on our team.

How many murals have you produced so far? 

 More than 35 but I am not sure how many are still up.

How have people reacted to Calle Libre?

It has been all positive feedback, especially from people who live near the walls that are painted during the festival. There is always a person from the team at each wall, and we have heard great things. We’ve also had funny incidents.

Such as?

When Mantra painted his 3D butterflies, someone asked us how he was able to put glass over such a big wall. And when Nychos painted a naked woman with a parrot on her shoulder in his signature Jugendstil-inspired style, a woman — whose house window faced the mural — asked why he was drawing her.

Do you focus on specific neighborhoods?

Each year we try to include new districts, but the 6th and 7th are where we have the most walls. It’s also where most of us live. These districts like the impact we’ve had, so we have good relationships with them. We try to pair artists with walls in relevant contexts. For example, the mural by Stinkfish — featuring a father carrying his child — is located on a kindergarten school property.

Have you collaborated with any museums in Vienna aside from mumok.?

The Albertina Museum contacted us about a possible collaboration on a Keith Haring exhibition. When we received the news, it was like we were knighted!

How do you get the funding to produce such a significant festival?

We get public funding from the city. We also received money from the European Union our first year. We apply for project grants, and we collaborate with local partners, based on where the walls are. It’s like playing the lottery! We never know how the next festival will be funded. We work for free and we love what we do, but it’s nice when the city and citizens give back. Every time we walk past the walls, we feel a sense of gratification.

Who are some of your favorite local artists?

Perk Up, Skirl, Frau Isa

What has been your biggest challenge since you first launched Calle Libre?

Convincing building owners to let us paint the walls! That’s definitely the hardest part.

Are there any artists on your wish list?

Inti, Pixel Pancho, Herakut, Os Gemeos. I also want to bring talented artists from South America who are not yet well-known in Europe.

I’m looking forward to seeing what’s next!

Images

1 Stinkfish

2 Kashink

3 Mr Woodland

4 HNRX

Mantra

6 Millo

7 Koz Dos

Interview and images by Houda Lazrak

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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