The mural pictured above was painted by the hugely talented Los Angeles-based painter and designer Tristan Eaton at Wynwood Walls in 2017.  Several more images captured by Houda Lazrak while in Wynwood for the weekend follow:

Spanish artist Deih at Wynwood Walls

Deih, close-up

Crash, Abstrk and Stephen Palladino 

Stephen Palladino, close-up

West Coast-based Hueman at Wynwood Walls

Pez, Kram and Bust collaboration

French artist Pro 176 at Wynwood Walls

Photos by Houda Lazrak

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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One of my favorite NYC walls is the one on 207th Street and 10th Avenue, directly off the 207th Street stop on the 1 line. Under the curatorial direction of South Bronx native Crane, who works up in Inwood, it hosts a range of veteran writers, along with their guests — often from out-of-state or abroad. I headed up there this past Sunday and was glad that I did! Pictured above is the work of UK-based Trik-09, who has been writing graffiti since 2005. Other images on the wall include the following:

The legendary Manhattan-based George “SEN-One” Morillo  (I tried to move the glass panel that had temporarily made its home there, but it was too heavy!)

Veteran NJ-based writer Ree Vilomar and Uptown wall curator and writer Crane

Crane, closer up

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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LIMINAL SPACE, Dave Persue‘s first solo exhibition at GR Gallery, showcases the varied and ever-evolving aesthetic of the acclaimed, pioneering West Coast urban artist. Along with works on paper and large canvases are images painted directly onto the gallery walls. On display, too, is a sampling of  classic merchandise — including a children’s book — featuring the legendary Bunny Kitty. Pictured above is the exhibit’s exuberant title piece, Liminal Space, fashioned with acrylic on canvas and glued onto a board in the artist’s frame. What follows are several more images I captured while visiting the gallery:

Dreamstate (Reprise), Acrylic on canvas

A series of artworks inspired by the West Coast artist’s current city, NYC, and its sprawling subways

Luck Dragon painted onto gallery wall

New York Wet Paint, acrylic on canvascollaboration with WANE

And from graffiti art to the aesthetics of fine art with Lafayette, Acrylic on canvas

LIMINAL SPACE continues at GR Gallery, 255 Bowery, through next Sunday. The gallery is open Tuesday – Sunday from 12-7pm.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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The 7th edition of the Basel House Mural Festival took place from December 7 through December 9 at the RC Cola Plant, 550 Northwest 24th Street, bringing three days of live music and art to the heart of Wynwood, Miami. As in previous years, artists from across the globe, along with local and national ones, restyled the industrial space with dazzling, brilliantly-hued images. Featured above is the work of Brazilian muralist Sipros. Several more artworks — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — follow:

Miami-based, Colombia-born Danny Osorno aka Anonymous

Amsterdam-based Hugo Mulder

Miami-based painter Claudio Picasso

Guatemalan artist Javier España

NY-based See One and Optimo NYC

Bay Area muralists Illuminaries, Kemest 510

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad

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Presented at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2018 and continuing though March 30 is Red Crown Green Parrot, a public art project by Kashi Gallery — conceived and fashioned by Jerusalem-based artist Meydad Eliyahu, a descendant of Malabar Jews, in collaboration with Dubai-based Thoufeek Zakriya, a Muslim who was born and raised in Kochi. I recently had the opportunity to speak to Meydad about this impressive project.

First, can you tell us something about the project’s title — Red Crown Green Parrot? What is its significance?

The title is inspired by the themes of the crown and the parrot which frequently appear in the  cultural expressions  of Malabar’s Jews — such as women’s folksongs, illuminated Jewish marriage contracts and synagogue decorations.The parrot is also a symbol of the storytelling in ancient local literature and culture.

What is the project’s principal mission? 

The presence of the Malabar Jews has almost completely disappeared — not only from Mattancherry’s physical space, but also from its collective memory. The project’s primary missions are to preserve the memory of Malabar Jews and to shed light on the loss of the unique multicultural dialogue that characterized Mattancherry in the past.

How did you go about trying to accomplish this?

Through a public intervention of a series of paintings and calligraphic wall works in Malayalam, English and Hebrew. The project is a walking route through the neighborhood that the Jews once lived in,  It includes a demolished cemetery with only one tomb left in an abandoned synagogue from the 14th century, along with several other hidden sites.

What were some of the challenges you encountered in seeing the project through?

We were uncertain as to how local residents would react to our reawakening a memory of a chapter that had ended 70 years ago. We did not know if and how they would accept it and whether they would want it to play such a prominent role in their present-day visual lives. That was one challenge.  Another challenge was  securing permission to work on the walls that we wished to use. That was something we couldn’t do until we arrived. But Thoufeek and I were determined to overcome any obstacles that came our way.

How have the city’s residents and visitors responded to the project?

Our most generous partners were the local residents. They welcomed us with great warmth and enthusiasm. When we were hesitant to put the first brush stroke on the first wall, they prodded us to start painting. Some helped us choose the right motifs and helped us secure walls; others helped with ladders and assisted with the clean-up. And we feel that we accomplished our mission.

“I’ve been living in Kochi for over 40 years, and this is the first time I’m seeing and learning about the Malabari Jewish sites,” commented one of the local residents.

Note: Created and performed in ‘Jew Town’, the historical Jewish urban area of Mattancherry, Kochi, India, Red Crown Green Parrot was supported by the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture and curated by Tanya Abraham.

Interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky; all photos courtesy Meydad Eliyahu

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Recently installed on the embankment of Sajsary Lake in Yakutsk, Russia — the second coldest city in the world —  is a massive sculpture fashioned by Spanish artist Okuda San Miguel.  Forged with steel in his infectious signature style, the 4-meter public art object represents the artist’s vision of the primitive man —  a punk-like figure sporting spiked hair, released from civilization’s shackles.

Curated by the National Art Museum of the Republic of Sakha in collaboration with Artmossphere, Okuda’s 4-meter public art object, Ancestral Retromirage, is the final project of the fifth International Yakut Biennale of Contemporary Art that began in April 2018.

Photos courtesy of Artmossphere

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On several day trips to Charlotte, North Carolina, StreetArtNYC contributor Tara Murray discovered a treasure trove of murals. Pictured above is an image of Neptune, the Roman god of the sea, fashioned by Matt Moore & Matt Hooker with Tucker Sward. Several more images of Charlotte street art — captured by Tara — follow:

Charlotte-based artist Nick Napoletano 

Osiris Rain with Nick Napoletano 

Miami-based Hoxxoh, close-up for the Talking Walls Festival

Charlotte-based Nico Amortegui

Argentine-American artist Ramiro Davaro-Comas for the Talking Walls Festival

Photos by Tara Murray

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Conceived in 2014, the RAW Project has been bringing color, intrigue and inspiration to schools in Miami and beyond at a time when American schools continue to see their art programs defunded. During the week of Art Basel, a group of outstanding local, national and global artists transformed magnet school South Miami K-8 Center into an open-air museum. The image pictured above was painted by Berlin-based Peruvian artist Danny Figueroa aka WESR.  Several more images — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — follow:

U.K.-based My Dog Sighs

London-based Otto Schade

Miami-based Jay Bellicchi aka Remoteroc

Miami-based Nicaraguan artist Luis Valle aka El Chan Guri

Denver-based Patrick Kane McGregor with Netherlands native David Louf aka Mr. June 

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad 

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This is the 14th in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of faces that have surfaced in NYC open spaces:

New Zealand-based Owen Dippie in collaboration with Al Diaz aka SAMO in Bushwick

Tel Aviv-based Solomon Souza

Huge segment of complete mural on the facade of the Brooklyn Commons on Marcus Garvey Boulevard

Brooklyn-based Ben Angotti in First Street Green Park for the Inspire Change Festival

Brooklyn-based Danielle Mastrion with Dorothy Gale, close-up from huge mural in First Street Green Park for the Inspire Change Festival

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak

While in Vienna, I had the chance to meet and talk with Jakob Kattner, founder of Calle Libre, the impressive mural festival that has been enlivening Vienna’s 6th and 7th district walls since 2014.

How would you describe Calle Libre? And why the Spanish name?

I would describe Calle Libre as a festival of urban aesthetics. My doctoral thesis focused on urban art in South America. I researched it there for 14 months, and this festival is my way to give back to the artists who helped me — who let me live with them and document their lives.

Where in South America did you do your street art research?

Colombia was the first country I visited. Stinkfish became a friend. He introduced me to the local scene, which really paved the way for me to explore further. I then went to Brazil, where I found a unique urban art style whose history is unfamiliar to most people. And, finally, Argentina. There I could feel how the weight of dictatorial history had impacted the street art scene but, also, how artists finally found their freedom.

How has Calle Libre evolved since 2014?

 We have broadened the programing every year. It started with live painting at the Danube Canal, along with an exhibition. We then added workshops at mumok. And the following year, we hosted film screenings, organized performances and presented artist talks. We also started doing annual signed screen print editions in collaboration with Limited Edition Art Prints aka LEAP. Among the artists we work with are Millo, Alfalfa, Inkman, Rodrigo Branco and Stinkfish. And in 2017, we launched guided tours.

What would you say is your main mission?

Intercultural exchange through art. We always include South American and local artists.

Is this your full time job?

I run a creative advertising agency called Warda Network. We produce creative, video and digital content. Actually, the agency does the documentation for Calle Libre, but the festival is its own separate nonprofit entity.

That’s why your online documentation is so great! Can you tell us something about your background?

I studied fine art and cultural theory. I am also a rapper. I’ve always wanted to work with moving images. I directed my own music video and that’s how I met my current partner at Warda Network.

Who is your team? Who helps you produce Calle Libre?

We are a team of seven. My fiancé, Laura, and I are the curators. When we started, it was just the two of us — and we still can’t believe how we managed to create an entire festival! Today, we rely on our team.

How many murals have you produced so far? 

 More than 35 but I am not sure how many are still up.

How have people reacted to Calle Libre?

It has been all positive feedback, especially from people who live near the walls that are painted during the festival. There is always a person from the team at each wall, and we have heard great things. We’ve also had funny incidents.

Such as?

When Mantra painted his 3D butterflies, someone asked us how he was able to put glass over such a big wall. And when Nychos painted a naked woman with a parrot on her shoulder in his signature Jugendstil-inspired style, a woman — whose house window faced the mural — asked why he was drawing her.

Do you focus on specific neighborhoods?

Each year we try to include new districts, but the 6th and 7th are where we have the most walls. It’s also where most of us live. These districts like the impact we’ve had, so we have good relationships with them. We try to pair artists with walls in relevant contexts. For example, the mural by Stinkfish — featuring a father carrying his child — is located on a kindergarten school property.

Have you collaborated with any museums in Vienna aside from mumok.?

The Albertina Museum contacted us about a possible collaboration on a Keith Haring exhibition. When we received the news, it was like we were knighted!

How do you get the funding to produce such a significant festival?

We get public funding from the city. We also received money from the European Union our first year. We apply for project grants, and we collaborate with local partners, based on where the walls are. It’s like playing the lottery! We never know how the next festival will be funded. We work for free and we love what we do, but it’s nice when the city and citizens give back. Every time we walk past the walls, we feel a sense of gratification.

Who are some of your favorite local artists?

Perk Up, Skirl, Frau Isa

What has been your biggest challenge since you first launched Calle Libre?

Convincing building owners to let us paint the walls! That’s definitely the hardest part.

Are there any artists on your wish list?

Inti, Pixel Pancho, Herakut, Os Gemeos. I also want to bring talented artists from South America who are not yet well-known in Europe.

I’m looking forward to seeing what’s next!

Images

1 Stinkfish

2 Kashink

3 Mr Woodland

4 HNRX

Mantra

6 Millo

7 Koz Dos

Interview and images by Houda Lazrak

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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