urban art

The Waterford Walls International Street Art Festival celebrated its 6th year in 2020. But it was a year like no other. Instead of taking place over a long weekend in August, it lasted for over 45 days, as artists from throughout Ireland arrived one at a time to paint their murals in accordance with social distancing guidelines. With live interviews and videos online, the festival successfully transformed urban spaces while, also, engaging the public.

The image featured above was created collaboratively by the noted Irish artists Aches and Maser. Several more images that surfaced in the 2020 The Waterford Walls International Street Art Festival follow:

London-born Ireland-based muralist and illustrator Dan Leo 

Dublin-based sign painter and lettering artist Vanessa Power

Waterford-based Polish artist Magda Karol

Dublin-based muralist and graphic artist Garreth Joyce

Irish printmaker and muralist Shane O’Driscoll

Dublin-based Niall O’Lochlainn and Waterford-based Caoilfhionn Hanton

All photos courtesy Waterford Walls; special thanks to Houda Lazrak for making the connection

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Pictured above in Part II of our documentation of the politically-driven “Shared Freedom” mural art project — curated by Will Power at First Street Green Art Park — is Calicho Arevalo‘s playful mural, as captured by Ana Candelaria. A few more artworks follow — with even more to be featured on the StreetArtNYC Instagram page.

NYC-based Miami-native Sacsix, “Chokey on the Smokey”

NYC-based multimedia artist Early Riser

Painter, actor and professional skateboarder Danny Minnick in front of huge segment of his beguiling mural — as captured by Berky

Veteran Bronx-based graffiti writer and painter Zimad – as captured by Berky

And Zimad earlier at work — as captured by Berky

Painter and graff master Heart1

And Heart1 — with spray can in hand — as captured by Berky

While visiting the “Shared Freedom” mural art project, be sure to stop by the  POP UP GET OUT THE VOTE / RETAIL STORE that has been set up  adjacent to First Street Green Art Park — on 35 E 1st Street. And don’t forget to VOTE!

Photo credits: 1 Ana Candelaria; 2, 3 & 7 Lois Stavsky and 4, 5, 6 & 8 Berky

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Based in Patras, Greece, Art in Progress — a non-profit cultural organization — is the force behind the city’s dynamic annual International Street Art Festival of Patras | ArtWalk. Its recently-held fifth edition has further enhanced the city’s urban fabric, as well as its reputation as a vital center of street art.

The hugely-impressive mural featured above was fashioned collaboratively by the Art in Progress team under the guidance and painting execution of Kleomenis Kostopoulos (KLE), ArtWalk‘s artistic director. It is dedicated to the 100th birthday of the late Melina Mercouri, a Greek symbol of culture and activism. What follows are several more murals that recently surfaced in Patras during ArtWalk 5.

The Naples-based NSN997 street art collective “dedicated to creating images that speak of society trying to represent the complexity of it”

Close-up

London-based Jay Kaes who is intent as a muralist “to contribute something positive to society”

Noted Cyprus-based artist Edmon 1419 at work as he pays tribute to the esteemed composer Ludwig van Beethoven in honor of his 250th birthday

Completed mural

You can find out more about Art in Progress here and follow its ventures on Instagram here.

All photos courtesy Art in Progress

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Back in 1984, Bronx-based artist and designer Eric Orr and the legendary Keith Haring partnered to create a series of chalk drawings in the NYC subways. The two artists then went on to produce a suite of drawings. Among these drawings is Repeat which had made its first appearance in the 23rd Street IRT uptown station. Six years later, the recreated drawing was auctioned at Christie’s!

This year signals a new beginning for Repeat, a unique silkscreen print that illustrates and celebrates a fierce friendship that began in the early 1980s at The Roxy roller rink in NYC, when two young artists decided to trade t-shirts on the dance floor.

Signed and numbered in pencil by Eric Orr with a plate that had been signed by both Eric and Keith Haring, the print was released last month by Gary Lichtenstein Editions to a wildly enthusiastic response. For further  information and to  join a Waiting List on a First Come, First Serve basis, check here.

Note: The final photo features Eric Orr and Gary Lichtenstein

Images courtesy Gary Lichtenstein Editions

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On March 26, 2020 the #ArtClinicNYC opened its front window on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Eager to find out more about this essential art resource, I posed several questions to SacSix, the artist who had conceived and launched it.

What is the mission of the Art Clinic? What motivated you to launch it?

At the beginning of the global quarantine — as businesses, schools and restaurants were required to shut down — I began to think about what makes something “essential.” Liquor stores, gun shops, marijuana dispensaries and even golf courses in some states are deemed “essential.” But what about art resources for kids? Art is essential to life. We need art to survive. And the Art Clinic’s mission is to provide necessary materials to kids to create art. The Art Clinic provides FREE coloring packs and crayons to each family member.

How were you able to access the storefront? 

The storefront is actually my studio. I gained access to it in mid-January.

It’s great that you had the space. And what about some of the challenges in seeing this project through?

The initial challenge was finding a place to print 1000 pages. All of the local print shops were closed. Through a connection at the Cheese Grille, I found a printer in Queens that was still open.

How did you source the materials — from crayons to coloring pages?

Over 75 global artists contributed to the project. I first started reaching out to my NYC street artist friends for the coloring page designs. Then I began expanding my network to artists throughout the country. After seeing my posts on Instagram in reference to this project, many more artists reached out, eager to be part of it.

And what about the crayons?

I personally funded the 500 packs of crayons and the cost of printing. Six-page packs are taped to the front window of the #ArtClinicNYC. Instructions prompt passersby to just pull the items off the window.

How has the response been to your venture?

The response has been great. I see it in people’s smiles — people of every age, sex and race. That’s why I do it. I try to snag photos of people, from the inside, as they pull off the coloring packs and crayons. Their smiles and excitement are so genuine.

Congratulations on this venture! It is wonderful!

Featured pages:

Image 2: Fumero, JPO, Con$umr, Pure Genius, Chris RWK, BK Foxx, Savior ElmundoSacSix, Crash, Al Diaz and Sandra Chevrier

Image 3: RX Skulls

Image 4: Danielle Mastrion

Image 5: Dirt Cobain

Image 6: Dr Scott

Photo credits: 1, 3, 5, 7 & 8 Ana Candelaria; 2, 4 & 6 courtesy SacSix 

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COVID-19, the global pandemic that has impacted so many of our lives, has prompted responses from visual artists — both on the streets and in their personal spaces. The image pictured above was painted by the Italian artist, Alessio-B. Several more images — stirred by the current crisis — follow:

Toulouse-based sculptor James Colomina in Switzerland

Multi-disciplinary artist Sara Erenthal — from her Brooklyn apartment

Tag Street Art in Tel Aviv

Philadelphia-based Sean Lugo

Switzerland-based duo Bane and Pest on canvas

Argentina-based Nazza Stencil Art, Portrait of  “the fight against Coronavirus,”  based on photo by Milan-based photographer Flavio Lo Scalzo

All images courtesy of the artists

Keep posted to Street Art NYC  for Part IV of COVID-19-related images — including several by local artists and news of some of the ventures they have launched.

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Whether working in their studios or on the streets, NYC artists — like so many artists throughout the globe — continue to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. The image featured above was fashioned by the superbly talented New York City/Bangkok-based artist Gongkan. Several more images created by NYC-based artists in response to the COVID-19 pandemic follow:

Sara Erenthal, Masked Feelings, Unmasked

Michael Alan, Uplifting the World

Adrian Wilson, A virtual urban intervention

Early Riser, Strong but Scared — with Jason Naylor on upper right

Ed Heck, Keeping Safe…Apart

Photo credits:  1-4 courtesy of the artists; 5-7 Ana Candelaria

Note: Be sure to check out WashYourHands.art, a fabulous Online Exclusive Group Exhibition — presented by Woodward Gallery — in response to the COVID-19 crisis.

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Organized by Ayana Ayo and coordinated by Kathleena Howie aka Lady K-Fever, Uptown Counts: Art as Activism is an exhibition of artworks by over 20 artists who lent their works to a range of uptown spaces to draw attention to the importance of the 2020 Census, particularly in East Harlem.

The number of East Harlem residents who respond to the 2020 Census will determine how much of the $675 billion in federal dollars the community will receive over the next 10 years — funding essential to schools, housing, healthcare, infrastructure and food assistance.  Yet, only 40 percent of East Harlem residents are predicted to respond to the 2020 Census.

Among the artists featured in the exhibit are several who also use the streets as their canvas.  The image above, “Mother and Child,” painted by East Harlem-resident Marthalicia Matarrita, has found a temporary home at the legendary Sylvia’s Restaurant. A small sampling of  images —  featured in Uptown Counts: Art as Activism —  by artists whose works also surface in public spaces follows:

 Danielle Mastrion, Offering — at Harlem Yoga Studio 

 Lady K-Fever, Justice at Last — at Sisters Caribbean Cuisine 

Royal KingBee, BEE Cautious

MED, Resist

Al Diaz, Flowers Will No Longer Grow…

Because of the pandemic, the spaces hosting the artwork are largely inaccessible for the next several weeks. But you can check out the entire exhibit — sponsored by the nonprofit organization Uptown Grand Central — online here.

And — now — be sure to take the 2020 Census!  It is a political and social justice issue. You can do it online, by phone (844-330-2020) or by mail.

Images and info for this post courtesy exhibition coordinator, Kathleena Howie aka Lady K-Fever

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The following post is by Street Art NYC contributor Ana Candelaria

An artist, curator, dancer and filmmaker, NYC native Savior Elmundo has long been a huge force in the urban art scene. Recently, I had the opportunity to find out a bit more about him.

When and where did you start tagging?

I was fifteen years old when I started. I grew up on the Upper West Side. My tag was REIN. It stands for Ruler – Equality – I – Now. My partner and I tagged and bombed everywhere — Harlem, the Heights, Queens and Brooklyn.

Were you down with any crews?

Yes. My mother moved us to Woodside, Queens. She thought a change of environment would be good for me. But it actually made things worse. I joined a graffiti crew in Queens, and I’d sneak down the fire escape at three o’clock in the morning just to go bombing. Everyone at that time was pretty much down with a click or a group, and there were lots of them.

And then what happened? Did you stay in Queens?

No. I couldn’t take Queens for long. I traveled to Manhattan and hit the club scene. Downtown — Soho and the Village — became my new home as I began working as a professional dancer. Hip Hop was — and still is — a big part of my life. I wouldn’t have become a street artist or filmmaker if it wasn’t for dancing.

What led you into filmmaking?

I wanted to tap into something else. I didn’t want to be a dancer for the rest of my life. A friend convinced me to do a short film based on a story I had shared with him. Reflection was my first short film. It was accepted into several festivals including the NY Film Festival. I directed and produced five short films in total. Life was going great until one day, in the midst of preparing for my first feature film documentary, I received word that a family member had passed away. I picked up the brush and began to paint as a form of therapy. That’s when art took over my life.

When did you first come up with your particular logo “MAKE ART?”

Ten years ago — when I first stepped into the art scene. I wanted to get a message out there that would make people think. “MAKE ART” incorporates art, film, and dance. It also serves as a reminder for people to make art. It’s simple, and I write it in a distinct way so people know that it’s me. I sign all of my pieces with my name Savior Elmundo, “MAKE ART,”  and the year.

Did any particular artists influenced you?

Icons such as Andy Warhol, Dali, Picasso, Frida and Matisse. Studying their work has helped me come up with my own style and ideas. For example, in one of my designs Dali and Picasso face each other wearing boxing gloves with my tag “MAKE ART” in the middle. Another one of my creations was inspired by an image of the boxer Muhammed Ali holding a draft notice from the army. I inserted a graphic design image of my tag “MAKE ART” on the document.

I consider myself a mixed-media artist. I like working with different things and I love texture. I do a lot of message work, but, lately, I find myself gravitating more towards my 3D art work. I’m also working on a couple of other styles that I will be releasing some time in the near future.

Are you generally satisfied with your work when you’re finished? 

I’ve destroyed so many pieces, but I’ve learned not to do that anymore. One day, I painted a canvas and uploaded a picture of it onto my website. Two days later, a client contacted me to buy it, but I didn’t have it anymore. I had gone over it and created a different painting. That’s when I learned that my work is not for me; it’s for them.

Your work has been showcased in dozens of exhibitions in a range of spaces. Do any particular ones stand out?

The 21st Precinct, curated by Robert Aloia, was one memorable show! Each artist was given one room in the 21st Precinct building on East 22nd Street to showcase their work. The building,  had three floors with about sixty rooms. I used an image from Rene Magritte’s, Son of Man, one of my favorite paintings, and turned it into one of my own images. I designed a man with a Goya can — instead of an apple — on his face standing in front of a stack of Goya cans. I covered the entire wall with a black and white wheatpaste of this design. As a Latino, Goya is a big part of my culture.

Another particularly memorable exhibit was at the World Trace Center. For that I  did an installation using a door that I had found on the curb side as a tribute for 9/11  The door read “Always In Our Hearts 9/11” in 3D letters.

And my first solo show was in 2019. All of my work was displayed in 3D. The show was a reflection of the past thirty years of my life. The words displayed were key elements of my past. Since 2010, I’ve been in a total of 70 group shows.  So many that are memorable!

How did you come up with the concept for Collage NYC, the hugely popular weekly live art event at The Delancey?  

As soon as I started to make some money from selling art. I wanted to do something to give back.  I wanted to build a home where artists could come together to create freely and inspire each other. I imagined a place where people could have a good time after a long, stressful day. I also wanted to bring back the paint parties that Basquait and Keith Haring used to participate in back in the 80s. The vibes are super chill! You can watch the artists paint; you can dance, or you can just lounge at the bar and have a drink. This year marked our 10th anniversary.

Have you words of wisdom that you’d like to share with up-and-coming artists?

Pay your dues and know the rules. Learn the process and put in the work. Don’t be late! Get your name out there. Learn how to talk about your art and how to sell yourself. Get out to every gallery in Soho and Chelsea on a Thursday night and just introduce yourself!  You have to hustle to get what you want. Also, it’s very important to understand the history of art and respect it. Don’t be afraid to take things to the next level. That’s how I got my start as a curator.

What’s ahead?

A two-man show with my brother A.J. LaVilla. I’m really excited about it. I’m also working on a project with a corporate company that people will hear about. There are more solo shows in the pipeline and other creative ideas are brewing.

Good luck!

Interview conducted by Ana Candelaria and edited for conciseness by Lois Stavsky

Photo credits: 1 Ana Candelaria; 2 & 3 Courtesy of the artist; 4 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 5 Tara Murray & 6 Lois Stavsky

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The following post is by Street Art NYC contributor Ana Candelaria

This past Friday, I had the honor of interviewing the legendary Ron English at the release party of Big Poppa classic colorway, a designer toy created by Ron English in partnership with Beacon-based Clutter. Limited to just 75 pieces worldwide, this historic drop featured a limited edition run of 10 Crystal Big Poppa classic sweater designer toys, hand embellished with 4,130 Swarovski crystals. Fans had the opportunity to meet Ron English, view and purchase Big Poppa, and pick up an exclusive collectible can from Kings County Brewers Collective.

Can you tell us something about the birth of Big Poppa?

Here’s a little secret! My character MC Supersized was a bit based of him! Biggie was still around at the time. It was in the late 80’s.

How long did it take to create Big Poppa? 

It took about two years from starting to sculpt to this final product. And that’s good for these things!

What inspired you to create Big Poppa?

Awhile back during a screening of my movie POPaganda, one guy in the audience got up and said, “We watch this movie and we know everything you hate. What do you like?” And I thought I should shout out a few things that I actually like — like puppies and Big Poppa!

What does your new character represent?

For me, he just represents inner joy and happiness. Being at ease with yourself, enough so that you can create without even trying, or at least seeming that you are not even trying. That effortless kind of thing!

How much of your art, would you say, is political? 

Probably — in some way or another — all of it; and — in other ways — really none of it. Most political things kind of come and go very quickly, or they become irrelevant. I actually try to create things that will have a relevance in a thousand years. If anyone will want to know what it actually felt like to live right now, I’m your guy!

Do you want your viewers to walk away with a message of any kind? 

I really want to create a feeling or a vibe that will infect your spirit and hopefully you go away a bit happier. You know…being able to enjoy life a little bit more.

What’s next? 

We just left a recording studio, where we were finishing up our new record called, We Are The New They.

Awesome! What kind of music is it?

The vibe is very modern.  I’m influenced by The Beatles and early rap, so I just put it all in there.  I’m working with some of the most talented people out there. And the great thing is because they’re all playing different characters, they embody all different styles!

Do you, yourself, listen to music when you’re creating? Does it inspire you?

Actually, no! When I create, I’m in a very deep state of concentration. Music could be playing, and somebody could be shooting a puppy, and I would be totally unaware!

Interview withRon English conducted by Ana Candelaria and edited for brevity by Lois Stavsky

Photo credits: 1, 2, 4-6 Ana Candelaria; 3 courtesy Clutter

Note: Photo two features UK-based toy designer and street artist Czee 13 to the right of Ron English

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