Williamsburg

Jily-Ballistic-and-JPO-art-17-Frost

SOLD Magazine launched this past Thursday evening with an exhibit — co-curated with Ellis Gallagher — and party at 17 Frost. When I stopped by early in the evening, I had the opportunity to speak to John Paul O’Grodnick, who — along with Greg Frederick and BD White — made it all happen.

 Just what is SOLD Magazine?

SOLD Magazine is a free magazine by artists for artists and art lovers. Among its features are: artists interviewing each other, studio visits, artist and photographer profiles, a travel section and much more.

What motivated you thee to launch it?

A sense that artists need a new platform for exposure. Our mission is to provide that platform.

chris-rwk-art-17-frost

 When did you guys first begin working on SOLD Magazine? And how did you fund it?

We began working on it at the beginning of October, and we funded it via a Kickstarter campaign.

It’s great that your campaign was so successful! What has been your greatest challenge in seeing this through?

Rounding up the artists whom we wanted to participate in our venture.

raquel-echanique-17-Frost-exhibit

 Was it an open call? How did you decide which artists to include?

No! It was artists we’ve known and worked with in the past. Some of them suggested others.

How often do you expect to publish SOLD Magazine?

Once every three months. It is intended as a quarterly.

elle-art-17-Frost-nyc

How will folks be able to get hold of it?

We plan to make it available in galleries and museums throughout the city, as well as in local businesses here in Williamsburg.

I notice that this premier issue focuses on female artists, with your first cover featuring Gilf and Elle. What can we expect in future issues?

Every issue will have a theme. Our next one will focus on collaborations.

Ramiro-Davato-art -at-17-Frost

 That sounds great! Congratulations!

Note: The above images of are of works that were on exhibit and for sale at Thursday evening’s SOLD Magazine‘s launch:

1. Jily Ballistic and John Paul O’Grodnick aka JPO

2. Chris RWK

3. Raquel Echanique

4. Elle

5. Ramiro Davaro

Interview by Lois Stavsky and photos by Tara Murray

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Savior-el-mundo-Frida

Highlighting the impact that Mexican civilization has had on other cultures, The Impact Show, El Momento del Impacto, presents a stunning array of artworks that reflect various aspects of the Mexican experience. Here are a few more images that can be seen in the backyard garden of the lovely Cafe de la Esquina in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Danielle Mastrion

"Danielle Mastrion"

Esteban del Valle, close-up

esteban-del-valle-art-impact-show-No-Se-Vende

Juan Carlos Pinto

"Carlos Pinto"

Albertus Alburg, close-up

"Albertus Alburg"

Ben Angotti

Ben-Angotti-art-the-impact-show

Curated by Savior Elmundo and Frankie Velez, the Impact Show remains on view for the next several weeks — with a closing party 7-10pm on Thursday, June 25 — at 225 Wythe Avenue, a short walk from the Bedford stop on the L train.  

Note: First image is a close-up from  Savior Elmundo‘s Frida.

Photos: 1 – 6 Dani Reyes Mozeson and 7 Lois Stavsky

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Living and working as a full-time artist in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Milan native Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz first visited NYC in 2008. He has since moved here, enhancing NYC and beyond with his strikingly stylish aesthetic. This post is the first in a new series of interviews with artists born abroad who have decided to make NYC home.

"Iena Cruz" "Federico Massa"

When did you first visit NYC?

It was the summer of 2008. I stayed here for a month.  At the time, I didn’t know anyone in NYC.

What brought you here? Why NYC?

I was on vacation, and I was interested in exploring other cities. I had begun to feel that Milan is too small for me.  NYC seemed like a logical place to visit.

Iena-Cruz-in-studio

What was your first impression of NYC?

I fell in love with it at once.  I didn’t understand it, but I loved it. I felt inspired by the chance to be connected to so many different cultures. I thought everything about NYC is great!

What was your image of NYC back in Milan?

It was out of focus. The only image I had of it came from what I saw in movies and music videos. I really had no idea what to expect.

Iena-Cruz-street-art-williamsburg-NYC

When did you decide to return here? 

I knew soon after my first visit that I needed to come back.

How did your family feel about you leaving Milan for NYC?

They were supportive. They know how difficult life is for an artist in Milan. Back home no artist is taken seriously until after he is past 50.

iena-cruz-puerto-rico-street-art

What were some of the challenges you faced once you decided to make NYC home?

I had to learn a new language. I had to find work to meet basic living expenses. I constantly had to concern myself with visa requirements and paper work. And in order to do all this, I had to put aside my painting. There was a general sense of instability.

Your current living situation is ideal – as your home is also your studio. How did you get so lucky?

I discovered this place on craigslist. When I contacted the owner, he asked me to show him a sample of my artwork! As soon as he saw it, he took me on as a tenant. At the time there were two other artists living here, both Mexican.

Iena-Cruz-bushwick -street-art

What was that like – sharing the space with these other artists?

It was wonderful at the time! And they’ve had a tremendous influence on my aesthetic. Through them, I discovered Mexican culture, and I’ve since adapted elements of it into my artworks.

Now that the space is all yours, how do you meet all your expenses?

Largely through a variety of commissioned projects. I also sell artworks and do set design.

iena-cruz-street-art-NYC

Do any particular projects stand out?

The huge mural I did for the Williamsburg Cinemas on the corner of Grand and Driggs was an experience! It was unlike anything I had done before – both aesthetically and in terms of the people with whom I interacted while painting it.  And last month, I had the opportunity to participate in FAAM, Fine Art Auction Miami in Wynwood.

How has your artwork evolved or changed since you came here?

My current works feature and fuse elements of Italy, Mexico and NYC.  And as I’m inspired to push myself here, my art is certain to continue to evolve and develop.

Cruz-close-up-street-art-Williamsburg-nyc

How receptive have New Yorkers been to your artwork? To you?

It’s been so positive. My sense is that folks here admire my work, and they’ve been so welcoming.

What’s ahead?

Now that I have my green card, I just want to keep painting murals and exhibiting my artwork.

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud  

Photos: 1. In Miami for the FAAM MAJOR STREET ART AUCTION and 4. In Puerto Rico, courtesy of the artist; 2. In the artist’s studio, Lois Stavsky; and 3, 5-7, In NYC, Dani Reyes Mozeson

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cycle -street-art-graffiti-NYC

Straddling the border between Williamsburg and Greenpoint, the building at 106 Bayard Street was transformed this past spring into a 3,000-square foot outdoor canvas.  The 70’s and 80’s NYC subway and graffiti movement was the theme of the inaugural 106 Bayard mural project, curated by Gee Dajani and Keene Carse.  Here are a few more images from both the exterior and interior of 106 Bayard captured when we recently revisited the spot.

Part One, Dr. Revolt, Wolf 1 AOK and Futura

Part-Revolt-Wolf-Futura-street-art-and-graffiti-NYC

Lady Pink

Lady Pink

A wide view from across the street with Part OneDr. Revolt, Wolf 1 AOK, Futura and Team

Part-wolf-futura-team-106-bayard-graffti-street-art-nyc

And inside — Whisper and Pure TFP, segment of huge mural

Whisper and Pure

Created and sponsored by Cirkers Fine Art Storage & Logistics, 106 Bayard will be transformed once again this coming spring.

Note: First photo features the legendary Cycle with Jackson and artwork by Williamsburg Charter High School students.

Photo credits: 1, 4 & 5 by Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2 & 3 by Lois Stavsky

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"Boy Kong"

Orlando, Florida-based artist Boy Kong recently left his mark in NYC. His delightfully fanciful aesthetic has made its way to the exterior of rag & bone on Elizabeth Street in Manhattan and to the shutter at 175 Roebling Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. A selection of his distinctly crafted individual pieces can also be seen at Cotton Candy Machine, 235 South 1st Street in Williamsburg, through this week.

On Roebling Street in Williamsburg

"Boy Kong street art"

And a sampling of what’s on view at at Cotton Candy Machine 

Boy-Kong-Cotton-Candy-artwork

Boy-Kong-at-Cotton-Candy

"Boy Kong"

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson 

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On view this evening from 7-11pm at 17 Frost in Williamsburg, Brooklyn is October Surprise.  Curated by Jason Mamarella, aka d.w. krsna, it features works by some of our favorite artists who are active both on the streets and in their studios. Here’s a brief sampling:

Billi Kid

Billi kid

Abe Lincoln, Jr.

Abe Lincoln Jr.

Cake

Cake

Jason Mamarella, aka d.w. krsna, close-up (look carefully!)

Jason Mamarella

stikman

stikman

And here’s a close-up from WC Bevan — who works with ink he creates on paper recycled from abandoned spaces

W-C-Bevan-at-17-Frost

Photos of artworks by Lois Stavsky

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Some wonderful walls have recently surfaced in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Here is a sampling:

Belgian artist Roa

"Roa street art"

"Roa street art" More after the jump!

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In town this week for the SCOPE art fair, UK artist D*Face is gracing huge walls in Manhattan and Brooklyn with impressive, satirical murals.

In Williamsburg, Brooklyn

"D*Face street art mural in Brooklyn, NYC"

More after the jump!

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Although Bushwick has evolved into Brooklyn’s largest free open-air gallery, Williamsburg remains home to a range of both sanctioned and unsanctioned street art and graffiti in an array of media and styles. Here’s a sampling of what we came upon yesterday:

Tristan Eaton, close-up

More after the jump!

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