mixed media

For close to three decades, Woodward Gallery has been enriching Manhattan’s Lower East Side with wonderfully enticing exhibitions and public art projects. On view through March at its 132A Eldridge Street space is New In 22 featuring strikingly expressive new works by 14 contemporary artists in a range of media. And among these artists are many who also share their talents in public spaces. A selection of images by these artists — whose particular aesthetics often blur the line between urban and fine art — follow:

NYC-born and based Puerto Rican mixed-media artist Jose Baez, “Visionary King,” 2021, Mixed media collage, spray paint, oil and acrylic on canvas (including found objects and materials)

New Jersey-based Hungarian-American urban folk artist RH DOAZ, “Always Inhabit Your Space 6,” 2021, Aerosol spray paint, oil, wood stain on reclaimed pine

The legendary Brooklyn-based artist Moody, “Alternating Portals,” 2022, Acrylic on wood panel

 Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist DM Weeks,Fight or Flight,” 2021, Acrylic, spray paint, and oil on canvas

Brooklyn-born, Dallas-based artist JM Rizzi, “Verbal Stick Up,” 2021, Mixed media on canvas NYC-based multidisciplinary artist Matt Siren,The Tragedy of Time and Space, 2022,” Hand painted with acrylic and glitter embellishments on wood panels

Hudson Valley-based neo-expressionist artist Cosbe, Soft Spot, 2022, Acrylic and mixed media on acrylic panel

Also on view in New In 22 is a wonderfully eclectic range of strong works by: Susan Breen, Tommy Flynn, Sabina Forbes II, Val Kilmer, Margaret Morrison, Alex Racine and Daniel Rosenbaum.

You can visit New In 22 in person at Woodward Gallery‘s street level exhibition windows 24/7. You can also see it online on WoodwardGallery.net, on Artsy.net and on the virtual Artsy Viewing Room.  A full color digital catalogue is available for free here and softcover catalogue is available to order here.

Images courtesy Woodward Gallery

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While many of us were pondering the world’s fragile state in the early months of the pandemic, the brilliantly inventive and socially conscious Spanish artist Pejac was busy creating art in response to it. And this past fall, he shared his vision in APENA, a ten-day exposition held in a former train manufacturing site in Berlin. Over 40 new artworks — addressing such themes as environmental pollution, climate change, the refugee crisis and inequality —  were displayed in eight different rooms and spaces. Several play on classical paintings; all are at once poetic and unsettling,

The image featured above, “Counterweight,” was fashioned in 2020 with oil, acrylic and spray paint and mounted on a wooden stretcher. Several more images of Pejac‘s artworks — all painted since the early days of the pandemic — follow:

“Urban Albatross,”  Oil, acrylic, spray paint and charcoal on paper mounted on wooden stretcher

“H20,”  Charcoal, Pencil, conté, and gold leaf on paper mounted on wooden stretcher

“Bad Time for Lyrics,”  Brass, bronze and wood

“Swirling,” Oil, acrylic and spray paint on paper mounted on wooden stretcher

“Oppressed IV,” close-up; Chalk and pencil on paper

And you can view the remarkable APNEA Exhibition here:

All images courtesy Majka Tkacik – Project Manager, Suben Art

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Richard Hambleton and His Contemporaries: Al Diaz, Ken Hiratsuka, Scot Borofsky, an exploration of the unsanctioned street art movement in New York City in the 1980s — through four of its most significant visionaries — continues through Friday, July 30, at Ideal Glass Studios.

The image featured above, Jumper, was fashioned in 1995 by the late Canadian artist Richard Hambleton, referred to by many as the “Godfather of street art.”  Hambleton’s mysterious, mesmerizing  silhouetted figures, variations of his iconic “Shadowman,” made their way into hundreds of alleyways and buildings throughout NYC after he had moved to Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Several more images on exhibit in Richard Hambleton and His Contemporaries follow:

Also by Richard Hambleton, “Untitled 1,” 1994, Acrylic on canvas,  70.5 x 62.5 inches

NYC native Al Diaz — prolific text-oriented street artist who had collaborated with Jean Michel Basquiat on SAMO© and maintains an active presence on the streets today — “Forgotten Names,” 2019-20, Mixed media on canvas, 30 x 40 inches

Also by Al Diaz, “Ghost Painting,” 2021, Mixed media on canvas, 21 x 30 inches

Japanese sculptor Ken Hiratsuka — who worked with hammer and chisel to create intricate designs  underfoot — “Islands,” 2021, Bluestone, 23.5 x 18 x 3 inches

Also by Ken Hiratsuka, “All Night,” 2010, Black granite, 38 x 26 x 1.5 inches

Vermont native Scot Borofsky — known for his site-specific works referencing ancient art from various cultures — (from left to right) “Farmer’s Daughter,” 1986, Krylon spray paint on linen, 60 x 42 inches; “Yellow Angel,” 1986, Krylon spray paint on linen, 60 x 42 inches; “Meditating Figure,” 1989, Krylon spray paint on linen, 72 x 72 inches

The exhibition can be viewed daily through Friday, July 30m from 2-6pm at Ideal Glass Studios. located at 9 West 8th Street in Greenwich Village. For viewings all other times, you can contact Salomon Arts Gallery at (212) 966-1997 to book an appointment.

Special thanks to Ana Candelaria, who attended the press reception earlier this week and photographed select works to share with us

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Prolific, passionate, and hugely inventive, both Clarence Rich and Mr Mustart are among Jersey City’s most prominent street artists. POLARITY: New works by CLARENCE RICH & MR. MUSTART, showcases their talents  — individually and collaboratively — in a tantalizing exhibition that continues through April 13 at Jersey City’s PRIME Gallery.  The image pictured above, 3rd Eye, was fashioned with mixed media on canvas by Clarence Rich. Several more images from the exhibit — curated by PRIME  Gallery director, Maria Kosdan — follow:

Mr Mustart, Polaris, Mixed media on canvas, 11 x 14”

Clarence Rich, Solace Sky, Mixed media on canvas, 24 x 30”

Mr Mustart, Dry Ice, Mixed media on canvas 16 x 20”

Clarence Rich, Hippy, Mixed media on canvas, 16 x 20”

Mr Mustart, All Eyes On You, Mixed media on canvas, 40 x 60”

Clarence Rich & Mr Mustart, Poetic Justice, Mixed media on canvas, 11 x 14”

And painted directly onto the wall by Clarence Rich & Mr Mustart

PRIME Gallery is located at 351 Palisade Avenue in Jersey City Heights. To visit you can contact its director here.

Photo credits: 1-7 Lois Stavsky; 8 Courtesy PRIME Gallery

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On our first-time, long-overdue visit to Jersey City’s Deep Space Gallery this past Sunday, we were greeted by a treasure trove of first-rate artworks in a wide range of styles and media. Currently on exhibit is MORE MINIS, the gallery’s annual miniature show, showcasing works by over 60 contemporary artists. While many are formally trained, others are self-taught. All produce delightfully intriguing work.

Featured above is a close-up from an installation of spray cans painted by Jersey City-born and bred multimedia artist and graffiti veteran T.DEE, along with a small sculpture — from the series Elephas Maximus Indicus — crafted by noted India-born, Newark-based “3D light artist” Sunil Garg.

What follows are several works by featured artists who also have a strong presence on our streets:

NJ-based GOOMBA, “#8 of 9,” Acrylic, spray paint and ink on canvas

NYC-based Optimo NYC, “AIDSERIES #5: And It Don’t Stop,” Aerosol, enamel and acrylic on canvas

NJ-based RH Doaz, “Moving On,” Mixed media on reclaimed wood

Jersey City-born, bred and based Clarence Rich, “Maelstrom,” Acrylic on canvas

Jersey City-based Catherine Hart, “Love Note 3,” Resin art, one of 12

Wide view of segment of MORE MINIS exhibition

Founded in 2016 by the multi-faceted Jenna Geiger and artist Keith VanPel, Deep Space Gallery is  located at 77 Cornelison Avenue in Jersey City’s Bergen-Lafayette neighborhood. To visit Deep Space Gallery and view the distinctly alluring artworks on exhibit through mid-February, you can send a direct message to its Instagram account. or drop an email to deepspacejc@gmail.com.

Photo credits: 1 & 7 Ana Candelaria; 2-6 Lois Stavsky

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Inaugurating its New York space with a sprawling, hugely impressive exhibition of a broad range of works by the late Jean-Michel Basquiat, the Brant Foundation has brought the spirit of the legendary artist back to the East Village. Curated by Brant Foundation founder Peter M. Brant with Basquiat scholar Dieter Buchhart and organized in collaboration with the Fondation Louis Vuitton, the exhibition, itself, is a cause for celebration. The image featured above, “Untitled,” was fashioned by the artist in 1981 with acrylic, oilstick, and spray paint on wood, A few more images featuring Basquiat’s raw and largely irreverent aesthetic, captured at this splendid exhibition, follow:

Museum Security (Broadway Meltdown), Acrylic, oilstick and paper collage on canvas, 1983

Big ShoesAcrylic, oilstick and collage on canvas, 1983

Hollywood Africans, Acrylic and oilstick on canvas, 1983

Irony of a Negro Policeman, Acrylic and lipstick on wood, 1981

Arroz con Pollo, Acrylic and oilstick on canvas, 1981

Boy and Dog in a Johnnypump, Acrylic on canvas, 1982

The exhibition continues at the Brant Foundation, 421 East Sixth Street, through May 15. Although admission is free, reservations are necessary.

Photos of images by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Curated by Laura James and Eileen Walsh, who work under the name BXNYCreativeLook Closer features deliciously diverse surrealist artworks fashioned by three NYC-based artists: Alexis Duque, Rafael Melendez and Juanita Lanzó. Reflecting such themes as connectedness, kinship, colonial influence, environmental decay and sensuality, the works on exhibit invite us into the subconscious minds of the artists. The image featured above, Dwelling, was fashioned by the Colombian artist, Alexis Duque, whose work I first encountered on the streets of the Lower East Side awhile back. Several more images of artworks on view in Look Closer follow:

Also by Colombian artist Alexis Duque

Puerto Rican native Juanita LanzóUntitled

Chicano artist Rafael Melandez, Order of the New Star, detail

Look Closer

Located at 755 East 133rd Street in the Mott Haven/Port Morris section of the Bronx, Hell Gate Arts , a handsome, welcoming space, is open Fridays and Saturdays, 12PM-5PM or by appointment, For further information, contact Bxnycreative@gmail.com.

Photos of images by Lois Stavsky

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Back in 2015, the American-born, Amsterdan-based artist Mando Marie aka Amanda Marie charmed us New Yorkers with her delightfully playful images that surfaced at the Welling Court Mural Project, the Quin Hotel and the 12C Outdoor Gallery. This Thursday, she will be sharing her newest works in Checked Out, a solo exhibition at Montreal’s Station 16 Gallery. A small sampling follows:

The iconic Reading Girl engrossed in Mad Magazine

A Collage of Book Covers

The exhibition opens — with the artist in attendance — this Thursday, November 29, from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM at Station 16 Gallery, 3523 Boul. St-Laurent, and continues through December 22.

Images courtesy Station 16 Gallery

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Earlier this month, the French Collective DA MENTAL VAPORZ — consisting of Bom.k, Brusk, Kan, Blo, Jaw, Lek and Sowat — brought their talents to Tel Aviv. At once darkly discomfiting and stunningly mesmerizing, their exhibition, Alone in the Dark, continues through March at the historic Beit Ha’ir Museum on 27 Bialik Street. What follows are a few more images I captured on a recent afternoon visit to the exhibition that made its way onto Beit Ha’ir’s walls, floors and celings:

From the outside looking in:

One of the many details of the installation

A bit of gore, detail

And some buoyant shapes and colors

One of many collaged images

Beit Ha’ir Museum exterior

One of several postcard images

Photos of images: Lois Stavsky

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Since September 26, 57 Great Jones Street — the former home and studio of Al Diaz collaborator, Jean-Michel Basquiat — has been the site of Same Old Gallery, a multimedia exhibit showcasing Al Diaz ‘s masterful wordplay and inventive aesthetic. Curated by Adrian Wilson and Brian Shevlin, it features a diverse array of new work by Al Diaz, in addition to historic photos and memorabilia from back in the day when the SAMO© tag that he and Jean-Michel Basquiat had conceived was the talk of the town. Several photos I captured while visiting the space follow:

Mixed media with stencil art

Another contemplation on the brevity of it all

Mixed media musings

With a message for these times

The 1978 Village Voice article that reveals SAMO©’s identity

And this weekend marks the launch of Al Diaz‘s book with a signing and talk

Photos 1-6: Lois Stavsky

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