Street Art Festival

Since 2015, the SHINE Mural Festival, has brought over 100 murals to downtown St. Petersburg and its surrounding arts districts. This past week, a diverse lineup of wonderfully talented artists — local, national and global — shared their talents to further enhance the streets of St. Pete. Featured above is the completed mural by the renowned German artist Case Maclaim. Several more photos, captured these past few days by Street Art NYC contributor Tara Murray, follow:

Frankfurt-based Case Maclaim captured earlier at work

Tampa Bay-based painted and illustrator Jared Wright

Miami-based Haitian-American artist Mwanel Pierre Louis

Miami-based multimedia artist Nicole Salgar

The SHINE Mural Festival is produced by the St. Petersburg Arts Alliance, the city’s the only 501(c)3 nonprofit dedicated to raising money and advocating for artists, arts, cultural organizations and creative businesses.

All photos by Tara Murray

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The first BLKOUT Walls Mural Festival, an all Black-produced event, took place from July 24th through the 31st in Detroit, Michigan. It was founded by Sydney G. James of Detroit, Thomas “Detour” Evans of Denver and Max Sansing of Chicago in response to their past experiences of participating in mural festivals where there had been a lack of racial diversity among the participating artists and too many expenses incurred by the artists themselves.

Each of the artists participating in the inaugural BLKOUT Walls Mural Festival was provided with a fee for painting, as well as free lodging, meals and transportation. In addition to live mural painting, the inaugural festival hosted artist talks, panel discussions and pop-up exhibitions.

The image featured above was fashioned by Detroit-bred and based visual artist Sydney G. James. Several more murals that surfaced last month at the BLKOUT Walls Mural Festival — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — follow:

Nepali artist Sneha Shrestha aka IMAGINE

Chicago-based Max Sansing and Roxbury, Boston native Rob Gibbs aka Problak

West Coast born and bred Jamaican-American artist “JUST” Giovannie 

Bay Area based artist and singer Zoë Boston

Mexican artist Victor “MARKA27” Quinonez  at work

West Coast-based, self-taught artist Rachel Wolfe-Goldsmith aka Wolfe Pack

Photos: Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad 

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The Waterford Walls International Street Art Festival celebrated its 6th year in 2020. But it was a year like no other. Instead of taking place over a long weekend in August, it lasted for over 45 days, as artists from throughout Ireland arrived one at a time to paint their murals in accordance with social distancing guidelines. With live interviews and videos online, the festival successfully transformed urban spaces while, also, engaging the public.

The image featured above was created collaboratively by the noted Irish artists Aches and Maser. Several more images that surfaced in the 2020 The Waterford Walls International Street Art Festival follow:

London-born Ireland-based muralist and illustrator Dan Leo 

Dublin-based sign painter and lettering artist Vanessa Power

Waterford-based Polish artist Magda Karol

Dublin-based muralist and graphic artist Garreth Joyce

Irish printmaker and muralist Shane O’Driscoll

Dublin-based Niall O’Lochlainn and Waterford-based Caoilfhionn Hanton

All photos courtesy Waterford Walls; special thanks to Houda Lazrak for making the connection

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Earlier this fall, four artists — representing different Brazilian regions and ethnic-social realities — shared their talents and visions in the center of  Belo Horizonte, the capital city of southeastern Brazil’s Minas Gerais state. Coordinated by CURA – Urban Art Circuit, this group of black and indigenous artists painted distinctly graceful, alluring images onto some of the city’s tallest buildings.

The playfully intriguing mural featured above — posing questions about societal standards and expectations imposed on women — is the work of the celebrated Brazilian artist Lídia Viber, who lives on the outskirts of Belo Horizonte. Several more Festival CURA 2020 images follow:

The largest work of contemporary indigenous public art in the world painted by visual artist and activist Daiara Tukano — the first indigenous Brazilian woman to paint a gable 

São Paulo-based self-taught artist Diego Mouro — intent on showing the gentleness and affection among black men — depicts a man tending to another man’s dreadlocks

São Paulo-native, multidisciplinary artist Robinho Santana depicts a Brazilian family

Robinho Santana, closer-up

All photos by Caio Flavio

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Based in Patras, Greece, Art in Progress — a non-profit cultural organization — is the force behind the city’s dynamic annual International Street Art Festival of Patras | ArtWalk. Its recently-held fifth edition has further enhanced the city’s urban fabric, as well as its reputation as a vital center of street art.

The hugely-impressive mural featured above was fashioned collaboratively by the Art in Progress team under the guidance and painting execution of Kleomenis Kostopoulos (KLE), ArtWalk‘s artistic director. It is dedicated to the 100th birthday of the late Melina Mercouri, a Greek symbol of culture and activism. What follows are several more murals that recently surfaced in Patras during ArtWalk 5.

The Naples-based NSN997 street art collective “dedicated to creating images that speak of society trying to represent the complexity of it”

Close-up

London-based Jay Kaes who is intent as a muralist “to contribute something positive to society”

Noted Cyprus-based artist Edmon 1419 at work as he pays tribute to the esteemed composer Ludwig van Beethoven in honor of his 250th birthday

Completed mural

You can find out more about Art in Progress here and follow its ventures on Instagram here.

All photos courtesy Art in Progress

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In its mission to “continue to grow and propel Kansas City into a mural-laden town that promotes creative expression and exploration,” SpraySeeMO  recently invited over three dozen artists to share their talents and visions on the streets of the Crossroads Arts District in downtown Kansas City. The magical mural featured above was painted by the wildly inventive Houston, Texas-based artist Tarbox. Several more distinctly diverse murals follow — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad:

Local artist Samuel Hale

Texas-based Emily Ding

LA-based Lauren YS

North Carolina-based Dustin Spagnola

Florida-based  Zulu Painter

Bulgaria-based duo Arsek & Erase

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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In its mission to “promote diversity through artistic expression” and to share public art with a wide audience, Wide Open Walls recently added 40 new murals to Sacramento’s visual landscape. The mural featured above was fashioned by the LA-based artist Lauren YS. Several more images captured during the fourth annual art festival of Wide Open Walls by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad follow:

Sacramento-based artist Molly Devlin

California-bred, Colorado-based Kirileigh Jones

LA-based David Puck

 San Francisco-based Mario Martinez aka Mars-1

Sacramento-based John Horton

Argentine artist Mabel Vicentef

Baltimore-based Jessie and Katey

And Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad in front of Jessie and Katey mural segment, as captured by David Puck

Photo credits: 1-8 Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad & 9 David Puck

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak

Earlier this year, I visited Waterford, Ireland, the country’s oldest city — approximately 100 miles south of Dublin. Best known for its exquisite crystal, Waterford has also become, in recent years, a street art destination. Using the arts to rejuvenate urban space, its annual street art festival, Waterford Walls, has transformed Waterford into Ireland’s largest and most accessible outdoor gallery. 

While there, I had a chance to meet Waterford Walls founder, Edel Tobin, at its headquarters, and speak with the nonprofit’s Assistant Project Manager, Gabe McGuinness, as we strolled the streets together:

You are based in an interesting building right in the center of the city. What an ideal location!  How did it become the site for your offices?

Yes, it’s great! The building was donated by a local family. They wanted to see what we can do with it to develop the arts in Waterford. 

Lucky you! The festival was initiated a few years ago in 2015. How many walls have you produced since?

We are up to 180 walls at this point. And we try not to paint over any previous ones.  

Why Waterford?

It started with a community garden project spearheaded by Edel.  From there, she got the ball rolling to showcase public art.

How did you become involved? 

I came to visit the festival one year, absolutely loved the project and applied for a job!

Can you tell us something about your background?

My background is in archaeology and geography. I am interested in integrating the arts with these disciplines. I also studied cultural policy and arts management. I’ve produced music festivals, and I’ve done production management for short films.

Just when does the Waterford Walls festival take place? And what goes on during it?

The festival takes place annually at the end of August. This year it will be held from August 22-25. We invite artists to paint, of course, but we also host other activities — such as panel discussions and talks on themes around public space. And we organize children’s workshop and set up live music events, among other things. 

Which neighborhood does the festival take place in?

In the first years it was in the city center. Starting last year, we expanded and brought it up to a hillier part of the city called Ballybricken. 

How do you go about finding and selecting artists?

We invite two or three headliners each year, and we also have an open call. Artists are encouraged to apply to the open call, which is generally held from September – December. The  selection committee then determines the final roster. We have hosted artists from all around the world and Waterford-based artists  — like Caoilfhionn Hanton — as well.

Is there an overarching theme each year?

No, there is no brief for artists. We ask them to create something based on what Waterford represents to them. We encourage them to spend time in the city before painting to seek inspiration from the local culture and history. Some of the common themes are: nature and animals, Irish folktales, Vikings, marine-related motifs and the famous Waterford Crystal factory.

What has been the impact of the festival on Waterford?

It has helped develop O’Connell Street as cultural quarter of the city. It has encouraged creative industries to come into Waterford. We also do focus groups with community members and ask what they would like to see. Their input serves as a basis for our five-year plan. Like I said, we’ve focused on the city center, but we want to expand to bring public art to the outskirts, as well. 

And what about the locals? How have they responded?

We’ve gotten a lot of support from the Waterford community! Some of the hotels give us free storage space during the festival and local businesses offer lunch to the artists. We also get emails from people saying they want to give us walls for the festival. Unfortunately, many walls are made of pebbledash, or roughcast, so the surface is tricky to work with. It’s basically plaster with pebbles thrown on it. They are okay for abstract murals, but details don’t work well. There are also local businesses who want to sponsor walls, so they pay for the entire production cost. Some of the murals have also been totally appropriated by the Waterford residents. The seated elephant by Louis Masai, for instance, is adored! There would probably be protests if it were removed!

What are some of the challenges you’ve encountered in seeing such a momumental project through?

We are well-known among artists but not by the general public. Most people in the next big town over, Cork, don’t even know about us. We are trying to change that. We started doing weekly guided tours on Saturdays from April to November, and we offer private tours, as well, for tourists or other visitors. We also host tours for schools interested in branching out of the more traditional Celtic art taught in class. Another, more practical, challenge is that artists often request walls without windows, which are hard to come across! The festival is also a non-profit, so it relies heavily on sponsorship. The last two years we’ve been sponsored by German Montana, but it’s tough to find funding. More and more people are coming to Waterford specifically for the murals, though, so that helps with fundraising. 

Yes! Myself included! The murals brought me here to Waterford! We wish you the best for the future. And we are looking forward to the 2019 edition! 

Images

1 Glasgow-based Australian artist Smug, Portrait of Waterford Walls curator, Louise Flynn

2 UK-born, Johannesburg-based Sonny Sundancer

3 The itinerant American muralist Arcy

4 Irish artist Shane O’Malley 

5 Waterford-based artist Caoilfhionn Hanton 

6 The French Monkey-Bird Crew

7 London-based Louis Masai

8 Dublin-based Ominous Omin

Photos and interview by Houda Lazrak

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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A cultural event that takes place on the Dutch King’s birthday, Kings Spray celebrated its 4th edition this year. Under the curatorial direction of Street Art Today founder Peter Ernst Coolen, local, national and international street artists and graffiti writers painted on container-installations scattered around the NDSM Wharf in front of the soon-to-be-open international street art and graffiti museum. The boldly-hued mural featured above was painted by Mexican artist Cix Mugre. Several more images — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — follow:

Barcelona-based Dune

Spanish artist Malakkai and Dutch duo Karski and Beyond

The Amsterdam-based duo Pipsqueak Was Here!!!

Denmark-based Balstroem and Richard Holmes

The legendary NYC-based Blade posing with Queen Taraji in front of tribute mural by Swiss artist Soy R2F with pieces by Blade & UK-based Dominic950

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad 

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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For the fourth consecutive year, The Crystal Ship Arts Festival invited over a dozen renowned artists from across the globe to Ostend, Belgium’s largest coastal city. This year’s theme, The Dictatorship of Art, featured a range of tantalizing murals — from the subtly toned to the richly colorful — several overtly political. In the remarkable anamorphic mural featured above, Dutch artist Leon Keer visualizes the impact of climate change.  Several more images — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — follow:

Mexican artist Paola Delfin,”Èèn”

Croatian artist Lonac, “Lost Ticket”

Valencia, Spain-based artist Escif imagines “No Borders”

 Barcelona-based Moroccan native Mohamed L’Ghacham, “Separación De Poderes II”

Frankfurt, Germany-based Case Maclaim

UK native David Walker

Curated by Bjørn Van Poucke, the The Crystal Ship 2019 actively engaged the local community — including students from the local school Ensorinstituut — throughout the festival.

Images 1-7 photographed by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad  

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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